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Machara and Kodori Valleys (historical Apsilia) of NW Georgia in Caucasia in the 1st to 7th centuries AD
Machara and Kodori Valleys (historical Apsilia) of NW Georgia in Caucasia in the 1st to 7th centuries AD
The dissertation concerns the historical Apsilia and offers a new theoretical approach to the nature of Apsilian material culture, which covers the period from the 1st to the early 7th centuries. Reasons are reflected in critical evaluation of the past scholarly contribution, where all problems have been analyzed. Three studies are conducted in this thesis that moves over two historical timescale Roman and early medieval periods. The author aims for her achievements and presents a background for new arguments and theories. First is a descriptive-analytical study of cremated minorities of Olginskoe cemetery. This attempts to reveal the full potential of acts, changes, and the purpose of individual choices, leading to distinctive practices and diversifying grave structures. They are patterns rarely considered in past studies of burial customs and drawing on this author’s new research, vision and imaginations. It sets out a new approach to the regional context of cremated minorities. New typo-chronology and relevant content of applied specifics (some are resistant to local origin) attempt to reconcile the components of the cultural definition (‘Tsebeldian culture’) of Apsilian material culture. They are unique components and a new context of hypothesis which can be tested in archaeological evidence. The other two issues derive from past scholarly contributions concerning the potential, perspectives, and functions of the geo-strategically significant NW region-Apsilia within Colchis/Lazica. It seeks to provide a broader understanding of the evolution of late Roman and early Byzantine Apsilian sites. This is a new approach to the study, which makes accessible the introduction of time-relative pieces of evidence and attempts to encompass existing knowledge about the studied material, but with a different perspective. It explores the possibility of new narratives by investigating broad features of trade and regional militarization that led to a global political establishment in Apsilia.
Apsilia, Colchis, Lazica, Gulripsh, Olginskoe, stempep, Machara river, Kodori river, Tsebelda, Shapka, Akhista, Pusta, Pali, Tsebeldian culture’ Tabula Peutingeriana, Peutinger Table, Roman road, Trade road, Byzantine warfare
Baghaturia-Kner, Eliso
2020
English
Universitätsbibliothek der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Baghaturia-Kner, Eliso (2020): Machara and Kodori Valleys (historical Apsilia) of NW Georgia in Caucasia in the 1st to 7th centuries AD. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty of History and the Arts
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Abstract

The dissertation concerns the historical Apsilia and offers a new theoretical approach to the nature of Apsilian material culture, which covers the period from the 1st to the early 7th centuries. Reasons are reflected in critical evaluation of the past scholarly contribution, where all problems have been analyzed. Three studies are conducted in this thesis that moves over two historical timescale Roman and early medieval periods. The author aims for her achievements and presents a background for new arguments and theories. First is a descriptive-analytical study of cremated minorities of Olginskoe cemetery. This attempts to reveal the full potential of acts, changes, and the purpose of individual choices, leading to distinctive practices and diversifying grave structures. They are patterns rarely considered in past studies of burial customs and drawing on this author’s new research, vision and imaginations. It sets out a new approach to the regional context of cremated minorities. New typo-chronology and relevant content of applied specifics (some are resistant to local origin) attempt to reconcile the components of the cultural definition (‘Tsebeldian culture’) of Apsilian material culture. They are unique components and a new context of hypothesis which can be tested in archaeological evidence. The other two issues derive from past scholarly contributions concerning the potential, perspectives, and functions of the geo-strategically significant NW region-Apsilia within Colchis/Lazica. It seeks to provide a broader understanding of the evolution of late Roman and early Byzantine Apsilian sites. This is a new approach to the study, which makes accessible the introduction of time-relative pieces of evidence and attempts to encompass existing knowledge about the studied material, but with a different perspective. It explores the possibility of new narratives by investigating broad features of trade and regional militarization that led to a global political establishment in Apsilia.