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From scientific research to healthcare markets. empirical essays on the economics of pharmaceutical innovation
From scientific research to healthcare markets. empirical essays on the economics of pharmaceutical innovation
This dissertation offers new insights into the determinants of biomedical science and pharmaceutical innovation, each in a self-contained chapter. The first chapter investigates the functioning of research tool markets, which are important input factors into science. Specifically, it observes why short-term distortions to supply have enduring effects on tool adoption and, thus, the direction of scientific research. The second chapter examines whether pharmaceutical companies adjust their follow-on innovation activities when patentability standards increase. To this end, it analyses changes in the innovation incentives caused by a drug’s marketing authorization. The third chapter explores the relationship between downstream shifts in demand and upstream research. It studies whether a policy-induced increase in market size affects scientific publishing by universities and corporations. In summary, evidence from these micro-economic analyses may contribute to designing effective and efficient public policies that help stimulate R&D activities, foster the development of new pharmaceutical treatments, and eventually improve public health.
Economics of Innovation, Pharmaceutical Innovation, Biomedical Science, Research Tools, Patents, Patentability Standards, Drug Development, Medicare Part D
Byrski, Dennis
2021
English
Universitätsbibliothek der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Byrski, Dennis (2021): From scientific research to healthcare markets: empirical essays on the economics of pharmaceutical innovation. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty of Economics
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Abstract

This dissertation offers new insights into the determinants of biomedical science and pharmaceutical innovation, each in a self-contained chapter. The first chapter investigates the functioning of research tool markets, which are important input factors into science. Specifically, it observes why short-term distortions to supply have enduring effects on tool adoption and, thus, the direction of scientific research. The second chapter examines whether pharmaceutical companies adjust their follow-on innovation activities when patentability standards increase. To this end, it analyses changes in the innovation incentives caused by a drug’s marketing authorization. The third chapter explores the relationship between downstream shifts in demand and upstream research. It studies whether a policy-induced increase in market size affects scientific publishing by universities and corporations. In summary, evidence from these micro-economic analyses may contribute to designing effective and efficient public policies that help stimulate R&D activities, foster the development of new pharmaceutical treatments, and eventually improve public health.