Logo Logo
Help
Contact
Switch language to German
Cosmological studies with galaxy clusters at x-ray, optical and millimeter wavelengths
Cosmological studies with galaxy clusters at x-ray, optical and millimeter wavelengths
The number of halos as a function of mass and redshift is a powerful cosmological probe. The most massive halos are inhabited by clusters of galaxies, whose observational features scale with the host's halo mass and redshift with some scatter. These features allow us to select galaxy clusters in X-ray, optical and millimeter wavelength. We demonstrate in this thesis how to extract cosmological information from a cluster sample. The major limiting factors to this measurement are the uncertainty in the mapping between observable and mass, and the uncertainties in the modelling of the selection function. We demonstrate, introducing novel techniques and developing established ones, how to empirically calibrate these sources of systematic uncertainty. We furthermore demonstrate how to set up empirical validation tests for the cosmological inference from cluster samples.
Not available
Grandis, Sebastian
2019
English
Universitätsbibliothek der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Grandis, Sebastian (2019): Cosmological studies with galaxy clusters at x-ray, optical and millimeter wavelengths. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty of Physics
[img]
Preview
PDF
Sebastian_Grandis.pdf

8MB

Abstract

The number of halos as a function of mass and redshift is a powerful cosmological probe. The most massive halos are inhabited by clusters of galaxies, whose observational features scale with the host's halo mass and redshift with some scatter. These features allow us to select galaxy clusters in X-ray, optical and millimeter wavelength. We demonstrate in this thesis how to extract cosmological information from a cluster sample. The major limiting factors to this measurement are the uncertainty in the mapping between observable and mass, and the uncertainties in the modelling of the selection function. We demonstrate, introducing novel techniques and developing established ones, how to empirically calibrate these sources of systematic uncertainty. We furthermore demonstrate how to set up empirical validation tests for the cosmological inference from cluster samples.