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Hypertension, obesity and depressed-mood as risk factors for the incidence of type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease
Hypertension, obesity and depressed-mood as risk factors for the incidence of type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality among men and women in Europe. Somatic risk factors, including hypertension, obesity and type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have been established as having the largest role in the incidence of CVD. However, while research continues to shed light on the pathogenesis, aetiology, treatment and management of risk factors, psychosocial factors have not received the required attention. The current doctoral thesis aims to provide a real-world perspective of the association between somatic risk factors and depressed-mood, and the consecutive impact on the incidence of T2DM and CVD. The investigations were derived from two published manuscripts using population-based prospective data from Augsburg, Southern Germany. The first manuscript examined the 10-year CVD mortality in participants with hypertension cut-off values according to the current European Society of Cardiology (ESC), in comparison to the recently proposed American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines. Departure from the current ESC to the ACC/AHA hypertension cut-off substantially increased the hypertension prevalence, while capturing a population with lower CVD risk. Furthermore, participants who were aware of their hypertension had higher depressed-mood in comparison to those who were unaware, reflecting a negative labelling effect. The second manuscript examined the interactive effects of obesity and depressed-mood on the 15-year risk of incident T2DM, aiming to understand whether depressed mood had an additional impact for prognosis of morbidity in obese people. The investigation disclosed that despite the significance of obesity as a risk factor for T2DM, presence of depressed-mood heightened the T2DM risk even further in obese people. The current thesis highlights the relevance of psychosocial factors, namely, depressed-mood, in clinical settings and for public health intervention efforts for CVD and T2DM. Depressed-mood is an essential psychosocial factor to consider in future aetiological conceptualizations of CVD and T2DM because it reveals mortality and morbidity risk beyond the traditional risk factors while simultaneously representing the quality of life of the individual.
Hypertension, obesity, depressed-mood, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes
Atasoy, Seryan
2019
English
Universitätsbibliothek der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Atasoy, Seryan (2019): Hypertension, obesity and depressed-mood as risk factors for the incidence of type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty of Medicine
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Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality among men and women in Europe. Somatic risk factors, including hypertension, obesity and type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have been established as having the largest role in the incidence of CVD. However, while research continues to shed light on the pathogenesis, aetiology, treatment and management of risk factors, psychosocial factors have not received the required attention. The current doctoral thesis aims to provide a real-world perspective of the association between somatic risk factors and depressed-mood, and the consecutive impact on the incidence of T2DM and CVD. The investigations were derived from two published manuscripts using population-based prospective data from Augsburg, Southern Germany. The first manuscript examined the 10-year CVD mortality in participants with hypertension cut-off values according to the current European Society of Cardiology (ESC), in comparison to the recently proposed American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines. Departure from the current ESC to the ACC/AHA hypertension cut-off substantially increased the hypertension prevalence, while capturing a population with lower CVD risk. Furthermore, participants who were aware of their hypertension had higher depressed-mood in comparison to those who were unaware, reflecting a negative labelling effect. The second manuscript examined the interactive effects of obesity and depressed-mood on the 15-year risk of incident T2DM, aiming to understand whether depressed mood had an additional impact for prognosis of morbidity in obese people. The investigation disclosed that despite the significance of obesity as a risk factor for T2DM, presence of depressed-mood heightened the T2DM risk even further in obese people. The current thesis highlights the relevance of psychosocial factors, namely, depressed-mood, in clinical settings and for public health intervention efforts for CVD and T2DM. Depressed-mood is an essential psychosocial factor to consider in future aetiological conceptualizations of CVD and T2DM because it reveals mortality and morbidity risk beyond the traditional risk factors while simultaneously representing the quality of life of the individual.