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Prospektive Studie zur Anwendbarkeit eines intramedullären Nitinol-Implantats zur Versorgung distaler Radiusfrakturen
Prospektive Studie zur Anwendbarkeit eines intramedullären Nitinol-Implantats zur Versorgung distaler Radiusfrakturen
Purpose: To examine the outcomes associated with the treatment of distal radial fractures with an expandable intramedullary cage and fragment-specific screw fixation. Methods: A prospective multicenter case series of 100 patients with a fracture of the distal radius treated with the “Cage System” was undertaken. Primary patient outcomes included Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand, Patient-Related Wrist/Hand Evaluation questionnaires, and adverse events associated with the device. Secondary outcomes included wrist range of motion and radiographic findings. Results: Follow-up was performed at intervals of 2 weeks, 4 to 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 1 year. Ninety-one patients were available for follow-up at 2 weeks, 87 at 4 to 6 weeks, 73 at 3 months, and 61 at 12 months. The mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score at 3 months was 21; at 12 months, it was 9. The mean total Patient-Reported Wrist/Hand Evaluation score at 3 months was 21; at 12 months, it was 11. There were 5 adverse events (5%)—2 involving radial nerve irritation and 3 involving tendon irritation from screws. Four of these 5 patients underwent surgical intervention, a neurolysis in 1 patient and removal of screws in 3. All patients were free of adverse-event symptoms at 3 months’ follow-up. Wrist range of motion improved most rapidly in the first 12 weeks following surgery and continued to improve throughout follow-up. The fracture reduction achieved at surgery was maintained throughout the healing process. There was evidence of callus formation at the fracture as early as 2 weeks after surgery with 100% of fractures healed at 3 months. Conclusions: An expandable intramedullary cage with fragment-specific screw fixation provides maintenance of fracture reduction with a low complication rate.
Distal radial fracture, intramedullary fracture fixation, cage fixation
Lindner, Lisa
2019
German
Universitätsbibliothek der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Lindner, Lisa (2019): Prospektive Studie zur Anwendbarkeit eines intramedullären Nitinol-Implantats zur Versorgung distaler Radiusfrakturen. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty of Medicine
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Abstract

Purpose: To examine the outcomes associated with the treatment of distal radial fractures with an expandable intramedullary cage and fragment-specific screw fixation. Methods: A prospective multicenter case series of 100 patients with a fracture of the distal radius treated with the “Cage System” was undertaken. Primary patient outcomes included Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand, Patient-Related Wrist/Hand Evaluation questionnaires, and adverse events associated with the device. Secondary outcomes included wrist range of motion and radiographic findings. Results: Follow-up was performed at intervals of 2 weeks, 4 to 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 1 year. Ninety-one patients were available for follow-up at 2 weeks, 87 at 4 to 6 weeks, 73 at 3 months, and 61 at 12 months. The mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score at 3 months was 21; at 12 months, it was 9. The mean total Patient-Reported Wrist/Hand Evaluation score at 3 months was 21; at 12 months, it was 11. There were 5 adverse events (5%)—2 involving radial nerve irritation and 3 involving tendon irritation from screws. Four of these 5 patients underwent surgical intervention, a neurolysis in 1 patient and removal of screws in 3. All patients were free of adverse-event symptoms at 3 months’ follow-up. Wrist range of motion improved most rapidly in the first 12 weeks following surgery and continued to improve throughout follow-up. The fracture reduction achieved at surgery was maintained throughout the healing process. There was evidence of callus formation at the fracture as early as 2 weeks after surgery with 100% of fractures healed at 3 months. Conclusions: An expandable intramedullary cage with fragment-specific screw fixation provides maintenance of fracture reduction with a low complication rate.