Logo Logo
Help
Contact
Switch language to German
A collective turn in the philosophy of hate speech
A collective turn in the philosophy of hate speech
The present dissertation is divided into five Chapters. As an introduction, Chapter 1 characterises hate speech, the harm it creates and its audience. Throughout our investigation, we defend the idea that hate speech is a harmful mechanism used in intergroup disputes for social dominance (Charles-Toussaint & Crowson, 2010; Duckitt & Sibley, 2017; Hoover et al., 2021). Moreover, it targets people based on their actual or perceived "race", colour, descent, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, language, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation and other identity features (Mihajlova et al., 2013). Therefore, its proliferation threatens coexistence within diverse societies, where people from various identities and backgrounds live together. Following Speech Act theory, which defines "illocutionary" speech acts as those that do something by saying something (e.g., marrying someone by saying "Yes, I do"), we feature hate speech as such an act (Langton, 2018a; Maitra, 2012), defending the idea that its power to harm others is directly linked with its capacity to perform various harmful actions through speech. By saying, "We do not want your kind here!", "Go back home!" or "Stop Islamization of our country!" along with other paradigmatic hate speech, we perform several actions: We rank minorities or disfavoured groups as inferior (Langton, 2012; Langton, 2018a; Langton, 2018b; Maitra, 2012), direct bystanders to side with hate speakers, order people to leave if they do not conform with the speaker's standard of a good citizen (Fraser, 2023; Lepoutre 2021; Waldron, 2012), encourage like-minded fellows to take action against targeted groups and, sometimes, perform several or all those actions at a time (Lewiński, 2021). Importantly, we defend the idea that most hate speech not only causes harm but constitutes harm to its targets (Langton, 2018a): whether ranking a group as inferior, blaming minorities for circumstances outside of their control, directing disfavoured groups to leave or legitimating particular treatment of them through hate speech, these all hurt people (Langton, 2018a). In addition, those actions can cause feelings of humiliation, helplessness, isolation, low self-esteem or anger (Fattoracci & King, 2023; King et al., 2011), harming people psychologically and physiologically to varying degrees (Eisenberger, 2015). Moreover, we characterise hate speech as highly context-dependent (Moreno & Pérez Navarro, 2021). This quality contributes to it being perceived as directed at different subjects, expanding its audience and the people it harms, going beyond its direct targets to also include bystanders and society at large. Depending on the context, the audience of hate speech may be any of us. Notwithstanding, as its audience, we all play a relevant role in determining, modulating and countering the actions a hate speech act can perform. Therefore, a good starting point to address this phenomenon should count on all of us, as potential audience, to identify whether and to what extent we perceive hate speech as harmful and the conditions under which a response contributes to reducing its harm. Following an experimental moral philosophy approach to substantiate our characterisation for hate speech and its harm, we conducted two studies testing ordinary people's intuitions in those regards, reproduced in Chapters 2 and 3. Chapter 2 reproduces a Registered Report published in May 2023 in Scientific Reports (Springer Nature), co-authored with Prof. Dr. Ophelia Deroy. In this study, we tested whether people are intrinsically averse to verbal harm compared to other kinds of hate actions (nonverbal, bodily actions) and to what extent. Considering that bystanders rarely report hate speech incidents and the legal, theoretical and social hesitancy to punish them, we hypothesised that people would be more lenient against hate speech than nonverbal hate actions, which share intentions and consequences. We conducted an experiment with 1309 British citizens who read descriptions of verbal and nonverbal incidents stemming from identical hateful intent, which created the same consequences. We asked them how much punishment the speaker (perpetrator) should receive, how likely they would be to denounce such an incident and how harmful the actions were. The results contradicted our pre-registered hypotheses and the predictions of dual moral theories, which hold that intention and harmful consequences are the sole psychological determinants of punishment. Instead, participants consistently rated verbal hate incidents as more deserving of punishment and denunciation, and as being more damaging than nonverbal incidents. The difference remained even when we shifted the scenarios to let participants know that the targets suffered no negative consequences (e.g., the target was deaf and so could not hear the racist remark). We explain this difference through the concept of action aversion (Miller et al., 2014) in opposition to outcome aversion, suggesting that lay observers perceive something inherent to speech that makes them assess it as more harmful and deserving of punishment and denunciation as opposed to other nonverbal hate actions, regardless of its consequences. Later, in Chapter 4, we interpret the intrinsic feature captured by folk intuitions in hate speech as the ability to harm by saying (i.e., constituting harm, and not only causing it) and to target different people simultaneously (e.g., direct-targets and random bystanders), which remains even when the speakers do not manage to harm their direct targets. Chapter 3 reproduces a paper submitted to the scientific journal Humanities and Social Sciences Communications, currently under review. Co-authored with Prof. Dr. Ophelia Deroy, Dr. Justin Sulik and Mr. Clemens von Wulffen, it explores people's perception of the role played by silent or opposing bystanders in reducing the harm caused by hate speech. We depart from two widespread assumptions: a prevailing passive attitude towards hate speech and the consideration of bystanders' opposition when facing a hate incident as helpful in mitigating its harm, something that has been stressed by governmental authorities, sociologists, and philosophers (Ayala & Vasilyeva, 2016; Langton, 2018b). We explore whether and under what conditions ordinary people perceive a silent response when facing a hate speech incident as increasing the harm it creates, and how opposing speech may reduce that harm. Across two online experiments with UK participants using custom visual vignettes, we provide empirical evidence that bystanders' expression of opposition can modulate how harmful these incidents are perceived to be, but only as part of a collective response: one that is expressed by a substantial majority of bystanders, which suggests the existence of a social norm against hate speech. Experiment 1 (N=329) shows that recognising the role played by silent or opposing bystanders who witness a hate speech incident depends on whether participants could take from the context the current social norm about how to respond to hate speech. In scenarios with three bystanders, participants recognised those who show opposition as reducing the harm created by the hate speech, while regarding those who remain silent as increasing that harm. However, in scenarios where the hate incident occurred in front of only one bystander, thus not allowing participants to recognise the social norm in place, they assessed hate speech incidents as equally harmful, regardless of whether the single bystander showed opposition or remained silent. Experiment 2 (N=269) shows this is not simply a matter of numbers but rather one of norms: only unanimous opposition reduces the public perception of the damage created. Based on our results, we advance an empirical norm account: group responses to hate speech modulate its harm by indicating either a permissive or a disapproving social norm, which may guide bystanders' responses. Our account and results show the need to complement individual responses with collective strategies (Chater & Loewenstein, 2022) against hate speech and other similar phenomena in which individual efforts seem not to suffice (e.g., climate change or global pandemics). In Chapter 4, we return to our philosophical assumptions regarding hate speech to revise them in light of our empirical work. First, we interpret participants' stronger aversion to hate speech found in Chapter 2 as the recognition that an intrinsic feature of hate speech acts is to perform various harmful actions through speech. These actions not only cause harmful effects, but also are harmful themselves and can target distinct people simultaneously. This is a result which other acts of hate cannot achieve and which is captured by folk intuitions. In addition, the need for collective responses and robust social norms in modulating hate speech harm, highlighted in Chapter 3, make us venture a new characterisation of hate speakers, challenging the idea that they are merely individuals or “lone wolves”, and instead casting them as members of a group. Accordingly, we defend the idea that it is a mistake to consider hate speech purely from the perspective of individual rights to free expression and discussion. The mistake is to treat harmful group speech with normative — and thus social — implications as an individual matter. Once hate speech actions, whether actual or perceived, become accepted by the majority, they risk mutating into policy options, susceptible of being supported by economic or populist lobbies interested in ascension to power through social confrontation. Although further developing this idea is largely beyond the scope of the present dissertation framework, we argue that harmful group speech with policy aspirations against disfavoured and minoritarian groups should not be granted freedom of speech protection under equal conditions alongside individual speech. Furthermore, we highlight the pressing need to challenge the assumption that ordinary people are lenient toward hate speech and other forms of hatred and intolerance. It is crucial to recognise and harness people's capacity to discern the harm caused by such practices and involve them in collective responses against hate speech. By doing so, we can effectively counter harmful discourses and foster tolerance and respect for diversity, thereby promoting peaceful coexistence within diverse societies. Finally, Chapter 5 provides a comprehensive summary of our research, highlighting its key findings and their implications., Die vorliegende Dissertation ist in fünf Kapitel unterteilt. Einleitend werden in Kapitel 1 die Hassrede, der von ihr verursachte Schaden und ihre Zuhörer charakterisiert. Im Rahmen unserer Studie vertreten wir die Idee, dass Hassrede ein schädlicher Mechanismus ist, welcher in intergruppalen Auseinandersetzungen um soziale Dominanz verwendet wird (Charles-Toussaint & Crowson, 2010; Duckitt & Sibley, 2017; Hoover et al., 2021). Zudem zielt sie auf Personen basierend auf ihrer eigentlichen oder wahrgenommenen „Rasse“, Farbe, Abstammung, Nationalität, ethnischer Herkunft, Alter, Behinderung, Sprache, Religion, Geschlecht, Gender, sexueller Orientierung und anderer Identitätsmerkmale (Mihajlova et al., 2013). Deshalb bedroht ihre Verbreitung die Koexistenz innerhalb von vielfältigen Gesellschaften, wo Menschen mit verschiedenen Identitäten und Hintergründen zusammenleben. In Anlehnung an die Sprechakttheorie, welche „illokutionäre“ Sprechakte als solche definiert, welche etwas schaffen indem man etwas sagt (z.B. jemanden heiraten indem man „Ja, ich will“ sagt), stellen wir Hassrede als solchen Akt dar (Langton, 2018a; Maitra, 2012), und vertreten die Idee, dass ihre Macht, anderen zu schaden, direkt mit ihrer Fähigkeit zusammenhängt, verschiedene schädliche Handlungen durch Sprache zu begehen. Mit den Worten „Wir wollen euresgleichen hier nicht!“, „Geh zurück nach Hause!“, „Hör auf unser Land zu Islamisieren“, neben anderer paradigmatischer Hassrede, führen wir mehrere Handlungen aus: Wir stufen Minderheiten oder benachteiligte Gruppen als minderwertig ein (Langton, 2012; Langton, 2018a; Langton, 2018b; Maitra, 2012), fordern direkte Bystander dazu auf, sich auf die Seite der Hassredner zu stellen, fordern Menschen zum Gehen auf, wenn sie nicht des Sprechers Standards von einem guten Bürger genügen (Fraser, 2023; Lepoutre 2021; Waldron, 2012), ermutigen Gleichgesinnte dazu gegen Zielgruppen vorzugehen, und führen manchmal mehrere dieser oder alle diese Handlungen gleichzeitig aus (Lewiński, 2021). Besonders verteidigen wir die Idee, dass die meisten Hassreden nicht nur Schaden verursachen, sondern einen Schaden für die Zielgruppen darstellen (Langton, 2018a): Ob die Einstufung einer Gruppe als minderwertig, die Schuldzuweisung an Minderheiten für Umstände, die außerhalb ihrer Kontrolle liegen, oder die Aufforderung an benachteiligte Gruppen zu gehen oder eine besondere Behandlung dieser durch Hassrede, all dies verletzt Menschen (Langton, 2018a). Zusätzlich können diese Handlungen Gefühle von Demütigung, Hilflosigkeit, Isolation, geringem Selbstwertgefühl und Wut auslösen (Fattoracci & King, 2023; King et al., 2011), und Menschen psychologisch und physiologisch in verschiedenem Maße verletzen (Eisenberger, 2015). Zudem charakterisieren wir Hassrede als stark kontextabhängig (Moreno, & Pérez-Navarro, 2021) Diese Eigenschaft trägt dazu bei, dass sie als an verschiedene Personen gerichtet wahrgenommen wird, wodurch ihre Zuhörerschaft und folglich die Personen, denen sie schadet, von den direkten Zielpersonen auf Bystander und die Gesellschaft als Ganzes ausgeweitet werden. Abhängig vom Kontext kann ein Zuhörer von Hassreden jeder von uns sein. Ungeachtet dessen, als Zuhörer spielen wir alle eine relevante Rolle bei der Bestimmung, Modulation und Bekämpfung der Handlungen, die ein Sprechakt ausüben kann. Deshalb sollte ein guter Ausgangspunkt, um dieses Phänomen anzusprechen, uns einbeziehen, um als potentielle Zuhörer zu identifizieren ob und in welchem Ausmaß wir eine Hassrede als schädlich wahrnehmen und unter welchen Bedingungen eine Reaktion dazu beiträgt ihren Schaden zu verringern. Im Rahmen eines experimentellen Ansatzes zur moralischen Philosophie haben wir zur Bestätigung unserer Charakterisierung von Hassrede und ihrem Schaden zwei Forschungsarbeiten durchgeführt, um die Intuitionen gewöhnlicher Menschen zu diesen Themen zu überprüfen, welche in den Kapiteln 2 und 3 wiedergegeben werden. Kapitel 2 reproduziert einen im Mai 2023 in Scientific Reports (Springer Nature) veröffentlichten Registered Report welcher gemeinsam mit Prof. Dr. Ophelia Deroy verfasst wurde. In dieser Studie testeten wir, ob Menschen eine intrinsische Abneigung gegen verbale Gewalt im Vergleich zu anderen Arten von Hasshandlungen (nonverbale, körperliche Handlungen) haben, und in welchem Ausmaß. Da Bystander nur selten Vorfälle von Hassreden melden, und in Anbetracht des rechtlichen, theoretischen und sozialen Zögerns, sie zu bestrafen, haben wir die Hypothese aufgestellt, dass Menschen bei Hassreden nachsichtiger sind als bei nonverbalen Hasshandlungen, wenn die Absichten und Folgen die gleichen sind. Wir führten ein Experiment mit 1309 britischen Bürgern durch, die Beschreibungen von verbalen und nonverbalen Vorfällen lasen, die auf identische hasserfüllte Absichten zurückgingen und welche die gleichen Folgen hatten. Wir fragten sie, wie viel Strafe der Sprecher (Täter) erhalten sollte, wie wahrscheinlich es ist, dass sie einen solchen Vorfall anzeigen würden, und wie schädlich diese Handlungen waren. Die Ergebnisse widersprachen unseren zuvor registrierten Hypothesen und den Vorhersagen der dualen Moraltheorien, welche besagen, dass Absicht und schädliche Folgen die einzigen psychologischen Determinanten für Bestrafung sind. Stattdessen bewerteten die Teilnehmer verbale Hassvorfälle durchwegs als strafwürdiger und anzeigenswerter, und als schädlicher als nonverbale Vorfälle. Dieser Unterschied blieb auch dann bestehen, wenn wir die Szenarien so veränderten, dass die Teilnehmer wussten, dass die Zielpersonen keine negativen Konsequenzen erlitten (z. B., wenn die Zielperson taub war und deshalb die rassistische Bemerkung nicht hören konnte). Wir erklären diesen Unterschied mit dem Konzept der Handlungs-Aversion (Miller et al., 2014), im Gegensatz zur Outcome-Aversion, suggerierend, dass Laienbeobachter etwas wahrnehmen, das der Sprache inhärent ist und sie dazu veranlasst, diese als schädlicher und bestrafungs- und anzeigenswerter zu bewerten im Vergleich zu anderen nonverbalen Hasshandlungen, unabhängig von ihren Konsequenzen. Später, in Kapitel 4, interpretieren wir das intrinsische Merkmal, das von den Intuitionen der Menschen in Bezug auf die Hassrede erfasst wird, als die Fähigkeit der Sprache, zu Schaden indem man etwas sagt (d.h., einen Schaden darzustellen und ihn nicht nur zu verursachen), und verschiedene Personen gleichzeitig anzugreifen (z. B. direkte Zielpersonen und zufällige Bystander), die auch dann bestehen bleibt, wenn es den Sprechern nicht gelingt ihre direkten Ziele zu schädigen. Kapitel 3 reproduziert einen Artikel, der bei der wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift Humanities and Social Sciences Communications eingereicht wurde und derzeit begutachtet wird. Der gemeinsam mit Prof. Dr. Ophelia Deroy, Dr. Justin Sulik und Mr. Clemens von Wulffen verfasste Artikel untersucht die Wahrnehmung der Rolle von stillen oder opponierenden Bystandern bei der Verringerung des durch Hassreden verursachten Schadens. Wir gehen von zwei weit verbreiteten Annahmen aus: einer vorherrschenden passiven Haltung gegenüber Hassrede und der Berücksichtigung von Gegenreaktionen von Bystandern in der Konfrontation mit einem Fall von Hassrede als hilfreich in der Schadensminimierung, etwas, das von Regierungsbehörden, Soziologen und Philosophen betont wurde (Ayala & Vasilyeva, 2016; Langton, 2018b). Wir untersuchen, ob und unter welchen Bedingungen gewöhnliche Bürger eine stille Reaktion auf einen Vorfall mit Hassrede als Verstärkung des Schadens wahrnehmen, und wie eine Gegenrede ihn verringern kann. In zwei Online-Experimenten mit Teilnehmern aus Großbritannien, bei denen maßgeschneiderte visuelle Vignetten verwendet wurden, konnten wir empirisch nachweisen, dass die Äußerung des Widerstands von Bystandern die Wahrnehmung der Schädlichkeit solcher Vorfälle beeinflussen kann, allerdings nur als Teil einer kollektiven Reaktion: einer Reaktion, die von einer erheblichen Mehrheit der Bystander geäußert wird, was auf das Vorhandensein einer sozialen Norm gegen Hassreden schließen lässt. Experiment 1 (N=329) zeigt, dass das Erkennen der Rolle von schweigenden oder opponierenden Bystandern, die einen Vorfall mit Hassreden beobachten, davon abhängt, ob die Teilnehmer dem Kontext die aktuelle soziale Norm darüber entnehmen konnten, wie auf Hassreden zu reagieren ist. In Szenarien mit drei Bystandern erkannten die Teilnehmer, dass diejenigen, die eine Gegenreaktion zeigen, dazu beitragen, den durch die Hassrede entstandenen Schaden zu verringern, während diejenigen, die schweigen, den Schaden vergrößern. In Szenarien, in denen sich der Hassvorfall vor nur einem Bystander ereignete, was den Teilnehmern folglich nicht erlaubte, die geltende soziale Norm zu erkennen, bewerteten sie Vorfälle mit Hassreden als gleichermaßen schädlich, unabhängig davon, ob der einzige Bystander eine Gegenreaktion zeigte oder schwieg. Experiment 2 (N=269) zeigt, dass dies nicht einfach nur eine Frage der Anzahl ist, sondern eher eine der Normen: nur einstimmiger Widerspruch reduziert die öffentliche Wahrnehmung des erzeugten Schadens. Auf der Grundlage unserer Ergebnisse schlagen wir eine empirische Regel vor: Gruppenreaktionen auf Hassreden modulieren den Schaden, indem sie entweder eine nachsichtige oder eine missbilligende soziale Norm anzeigen, die die Reaktionen der Bystander leiten kann. Unsere Darstellung und unsere Ergebnisse zeigen die Notwendigkeit, individuelle Reaktionen mit kollektiven Strategien (Chater & Loewenstein, 2022) auf Hassreden und ähnliche Phänomene zu ergänzen, bei denen individuelle Bemühungen nicht auszureichen scheinen (z. B. Klimawandel oder globale Pandemien). In Kapitel 4 kehren wir zu unseren philosophischen Annahmen über Hassrede zurück, um sie im Lichte unserer empirischen Resultate zu überarbeiten. Erstens interpretieren wir die stärkere Aversion der Teilnehmer gegenüber Hassreden wie in Kapitel 2 als die Wahrnehmung, dass es ein intrinsisches Merkmal von Hassreden ist, verschiedene schädliche Handlungen durch Sprache auszuführen. Diese Handlungen verursachen nicht nur schädliche Effekte, sondern stellen selbst einen Schaden dar und können verschiedene Menschen gleichzeitig schädigen. Das ist ein Ergebnis, welches andere Hasshandlungen nicht erreichen können, und das vom Volksempfinden erfasst wird. Darüber hinaus lässt uns die Notwendigkeit für eine kollektive Reaktion und für robuste soziale Normen zur Modulation des Schadens von Hassrede, hervorgehoben in Kapitel 3, eine neue Charakterisierung von Hassrednern wagen, die Idee hinterfragend, dass diese lediglich Individuen oder „einsame Wölfe“ sind, und betrachten diese stattdessen als Mitglieder einer Gruppe. Dementsprechend verteidigen wir die Idee, dass es ein Fehler ist, Hassrede ausschließlich aus der Perspektive von individuellen Rechten auf freie Meinungsäußerung und Diskussion zu betrachten. Der Fehler ist es, schädliche Gruppensprache mit normativen — und damit sozialen — Implikationen als individuelle Angelegenheit zu behandeln. Sobald die durch Hassrede durchgeführten Handlungen, ob tatsächlich oder empfunden, mehrheitlich akzeptiert werden, besteht die Gefahr, dass sie zu politischen Optionen mutieren, die von wirtschaftlichen oder populistischen Lobbys unterstützt werden können, welche daran interessiert sind, durch soziale Konfrontation an die Macht gelangen. Auch wenn die weitere Entwicklung dieser Idee den Rahmen dieser Dissertation sprengen würde, argumentieren wir, dass schädliche Gruppenäußerungen mit normativen Ansprüchen gegenüber benachteiligter und minoritärer Gruppen nicht unter gleichen Bedingungen wie individuelle Äußerungen durch die Redefreiheit geschützt werden sollten. Darüber hinaus betonen wir die Dringlichkeit, die Annahme von Nachsicht von gewöhnlichen Bürgern gegenüber Hassrede und anderen Formen von Hass und Intoleranz in Frage zu stellen. Stattdessen müssen wir ihre Fähigkeit nutzen, den von Hassrede verursachten Schaden zu erkennen, um ihn kollektiv zu bekämpfen. Das bedeutet, wir sollten Initiativen fördern, welche schädlichen Diskursen entgegenwirken und Werte von Toleranz und Respekt für Diversität stärken, zu Gunsten einer friedlichen Koexistenz innerhalb verschiedener Gesellschaften. Abschließend fasst Kapitel 5 die wichtigsten Ergebnisse unserer Untersuchung zusammen.
Not available
Zapata, Jimena
2023
English
Universitätsbibliothek der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Zapata, Jimena (2023): A collective turn in the philosophy of hate speech. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty of Philosophy, Philosophy of Science and the Study of Religion
[thumbnail of Zapata_Jimena.pdf]
Preview
PDF
Zapata_Jimena.pdf

5MB

Abstract

The present dissertation is divided into five Chapters. As an introduction, Chapter 1 characterises hate speech, the harm it creates and its audience. Throughout our investigation, we defend the idea that hate speech is a harmful mechanism used in intergroup disputes for social dominance (Charles-Toussaint & Crowson, 2010; Duckitt & Sibley, 2017; Hoover et al., 2021). Moreover, it targets people based on their actual or perceived "race", colour, descent, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, language, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation and other identity features (Mihajlova et al., 2013). Therefore, its proliferation threatens coexistence within diverse societies, where people from various identities and backgrounds live together. Following Speech Act theory, which defines "illocutionary" speech acts as those that do something by saying something (e.g., marrying someone by saying "Yes, I do"), we feature hate speech as such an act (Langton, 2018a; Maitra, 2012), defending the idea that its power to harm others is directly linked with its capacity to perform various harmful actions through speech. By saying, "We do not want your kind here!", "Go back home!" or "Stop Islamization of our country!" along with other paradigmatic hate speech, we perform several actions: We rank minorities or disfavoured groups as inferior (Langton, 2012; Langton, 2018a; Langton, 2018b; Maitra, 2012), direct bystanders to side with hate speakers, order people to leave if they do not conform with the speaker's standard of a good citizen (Fraser, 2023; Lepoutre 2021; Waldron, 2012), encourage like-minded fellows to take action against targeted groups and, sometimes, perform several or all those actions at a time (Lewiński, 2021). Importantly, we defend the idea that most hate speech not only causes harm but constitutes harm to its targets (Langton, 2018a): whether ranking a group as inferior, blaming minorities for circumstances outside of their control, directing disfavoured groups to leave or legitimating particular treatment of them through hate speech, these all hurt people (Langton, 2018a). In addition, those actions can cause feelings of humiliation, helplessness, isolation, low self-esteem or anger (Fattoracci & King, 2023; King et al., 2011), harming people psychologically and physiologically to varying degrees (Eisenberger, 2015). Moreover, we characterise hate speech as highly context-dependent (Moreno & Pérez Navarro, 2021). This quality contributes to it being perceived as directed at different subjects, expanding its audience and the people it harms, going beyond its direct targets to also include bystanders and society at large. Depending on the context, the audience of hate speech may be any of us. Notwithstanding, as its audience, we all play a relevant role in determining, modulating and countering the actions a hate speech act can perform. Therefore, a good starting point to address this phenomenon should count on all of us, as potential audience, to identify whether and to what extent we perceive hate speech as harmful and the conditions under which a response contributes to reducing its harm. Following an experimental moral philosophy approach to substantiate our characterisation for hate speech and its harm, we conducted two studies testing ordinary people's intuitions in those regards, reproduced in Chapters 2 and 3. Chapter 2 reproduces a Registered Report published in May 2023 in Scientific Reports (Springer Nature), co-authored with Prof. Dr. Ophelia Deroy. In this study, we tested whether people are intrinsically averse to verbal harm compared to other kinds of hate actions (nonverbal, bodily actions) and to what extent. Considering that bystanders rarely report hate speech incidents and the legal, theoretical and social hesitancy to punish them, we hypothesised that people would be more lenient against hate speech than nonverbal hate actions, which share intentions and consequences. We conducted an experiment with 1309 British citizens who read descriptions of verbal and nonverbal incidents stemming from identical hateful intent, which created the same consequences. We asked them how much punishment the speaker (perpetrator) should receive, how likely they would be to denounce such an incident and how harmful the actions were. The results contradicted our pre-registered hypotheses and the predictions of dual moral theories, which hold that intention and harmful consequences are the sole psychological determinants of punishment. Instead, participants consistently rated verbal hate incidents as more deserving of punishment and denunciation, and as being more damaging than nonverbal incidents. The difference remained even when we shifted the scenarios to let participants know that the targets suffered no negative consequences (e.g., the target was deaf and so could not hear the racist remark). We explain this difference through the concept of action aversion (Miller et al., 2014) in opposition to outcome aversion, suggesting that lay observers perceive something inherent to speech that makes them assess it as more harmful and deserving of punishment and denunciation as opposed to other nonverbal hate actions, regardless of its consequences. Later, in Chapter 4, we interpret the intrinsic feature captured by folk intuitions in hate speech as the ability to harm by saying (i.e., constituting harm, and not only causing it) and to target different people simultaneously (e.g., direct-targets and random bystanders), which remains even when the speakers do not manage to harm their direct targets. Chapter 3 reproduces a paper submitted to the scientific journal Humanities and Social Sciences Communications, currently under review. Co-authored with Prof. Dr. Ophelia Deroy, Dr. Justin Sulik and Mr. Clemens von Wulffen, it explores people's perception of the role played by silent or opposing bystanders in reducing the harm caused by hate speech. We depart from two widespread assumptions: a prevailing passive attitude towards hate speech and the consideration of bystanders' opposition when facing a hate incident as helpful in mitigating its harm, something that has been stressed by governmental authorities, sociologists, and philosophers (Ayala & Vasilyeva, 2016; Langton, 2018b). We explore whether and under what conditions ordinary people perceive a silent response when facing a hate speech incident as increasing the harm it creates, and how opposing speech may reduce that harm. Across two online experiments with UK participants using custom visual vignettes, we provide empirical evidence that bystanders' expression of opposition can modulate how harmful these incidents are perceived to be, but only as part of a collective response: one that is expressed by a substantial majority of bystanders, which suggests the existence of a social norm against hate speech. Experiment 1 (N=329) shows that recognising the role played by silent or opposing bystanders who witness a hate speech incident depends on whether participants could take from the context the current social norm about how to respond to hate speech. In scenarios with three bystanders, participants recognised those who show opposition as reducing the harm created by the hate speech, while regarding those who remain silent as increasing that harm. However, in scenarios where the hate incident occurred in front of only one bystander, thus not allowing participants to recognise the social norm in place, they assessed hate speech incidents as equally harmful, regardless of whether the single bystander showed opposition or remained silent. Experiment 2 (N=269) shows this is not simply a matter of numbers but rather one of norms: only unanimous opposition reduces the public perception of the damage created. Based on our results, we advance an empirical norm account: group responses to hate speech modulate its harm by indicating either a permissive or a disapproving social norm, which may guide bystanders' responses. Our account and results show the need to complement individual responses with collective strategies (Chater & Loewenstein, 2022) against hate speech and other similar phenomena in which individual efforts seem not to suffice (e.g., climate change or global pandemics). In Chapter 4, we return to our philosophical assumptions regarding hate speech to revise them in light of our empirical work. First, we interpret participants' stronger aversion to hate speech found in Chapter 2 as the recognition that an intrinsic feature of hate speech acts is to perform various harmful actions through speech. These actions not only cause harmful effects, but also are harmful themselves and can target distinct people simultaneously. This is a result which other acts of hate cannot achieve and which is captured by folk intuitions. In addition, the need for collective responses and robust social norms in modulating hate speech harm, highlighted in Chapter 3, make us venture a new characterisation of hate speakers, challenging the idea that they are merely individuals or “lone wolves”, and instead casting them as members of a group. Accordingly, we defend the idea that it is a mistake to consider hate speech purely from the perspective of individual rights to free expression and discussion. The mistake is to treat harmful group speech with normative — and thus social — implications as an individual matter. Once hate speech actions, whether actual or perceived, become accepted by the majority, they risk mutating into policy options, susceptible of being supported by economic or populist lobbies interested in ascension to power through social confrontation. Although further developing this idea is largely beyond the scope of the present dissertation framework, we argue that harmful group speech with policy aspirations against disfavoured and minoritarian groups should not be granted freedom of speech protection under equal conditions alongside individual speech. Furthermore, we highlight the pressing need to challenge the assumption that ordinary people are lenient toward hate speech and other forms of hatred and intolerance. It is crucial to recognise and harness people's capacity to discern the harm caused by such practices and involve them in collective responses against hate speech. By doing so, we can effectively counter harmful discourses and foster tolerance and respect for diversity, thereby promoting peaceful coexistence within diverse societies. Finally, Chapter 5 provides a comprehensive summary of our research, highlighting its key findings and their implications.

Abstract

Die vorliegende Dissertation ist in fünf Kapitel unterteilt. Einleitend werden in Kapitel 1 die Hassrede, der von ihr verursachte Schaden und ihre Zuhörer charakterisiert. Im Rahmen unserer Studie vertreten wir die Idee, dass Hassrede ein schädlicher Mechanismus ist, welcher in intergruppalen Auseinandersetzungen um soziale Dominanz verwendet wird (Charles-Toussaint & Crowson, 2010; Duckitt & Sibley, 2017; Hoover et al., 2021). Zudem zielt sie auf Personen basierend auf ihrer eigentlichen oder wahrgenommenen „Rasse“, Farbe, Abstammung, Nationalität, ethnischer Herkunft, Alter, Behinderung, Sprache, Religion, Geschlecht, Gender, sexueller Orientierung und anderer Identitätsmerkmale (Mihajlova et al., 2013). Deshalb bedroht ihre Verbreitung die Koexistenz innerhalb von vielfältigen Gesellschaften, wo Menschen mit verschiedenen Identitäten und Hintergründen zusammenleben. In Anlehnung an die Sprechakttheorie, welche „illokutionäre“ Sprechakte als solche definiert, welche etwas schaffen indem man etwas sagt (z.B. jemanden heiraten indem man „Ja, ich will“ sagt), stellen wir Hassrede als solchen Akt dar (Langton, 2018a; Maitra, 2012), und vertreten die Idee, dass ihre Macht, anderen zu schaden, direkt mit ihrer Fähigkeit zusammenhängt, verschiedene schädliche Handlungen durch Sprache zu begehen. Mit den Worten „Wir wollen euresgleichen hier nicht!“, „Geh zurück nach Hause!“, „Hör auf unser Land zu Islamisieren“, neben anderer paradigmatischer Hassrede, führen wir mehrere Handlungen aus: Wir stufen Minderheiten oder benachteiligte Gruppen als minderwertig ein (Langton, 2012; Langton, 2018a; Langton, 2018b; Maitra, 2012), fordern direkte Bystander dazu auf, sich auf die Seite der Hassredner zu stellen, fordern Menschen zum Gehen auf, wenn sie nicht des Sprechers Standards von einem guten Bürger genügen (Fraser, 2023; Lepoutre 2021; Waldron, 2012), ermutigen Gleichgesinnte dazu gegen Zielgruppen vorzugehen, und führen manchmal mehrere dieser oder alle diese Handlungen gleichzeitig aus (Lewiński, 2021). Besonders verteidigen wir die Idee, dass die meisten Hassreden nicht nur Schaden verursachen, sondern einen Schaden für die Zielgruppen darstellen (Langton, 2018a): Ob die Einstufung einer Gruppe als minderwertig, die Schuldzuweisung an Minderheiten für Umstände, die außerhalb ihrer Kontrolle liegen, oder die Aufforderung an benachteiligte Gruppen zu gehen oder eine besondere Behandlung dieser durch Hassrede, all dies verletzt Menschen (Langton, 2018a). Zusätzlich können diese Handlungen Gefühle von Demütigung, Hilflosigkeit, Isolation, geringem Selbstwertgefühl und Wut auslösen (Fattoracci & King, 2023; King et al., 2011), und Menschen psychologisch und physiologisch in verschiedenem Maße verletzen (Eisenberger, 2015). Zudem charakterisieren wir Hassrede als stark kontextabhängig (Moreno, & Pérez-Navarro, 2021) Diese Eigenschaft trägt dazu bei, dass sie als an verschiedene Personen gerichtet wahrgenommen wird, wodurch ihre Zuhörerschaft und folglich die Personen, denen sie schadet, von den direkten Zielpersonen auf Bystander und die Gesellschaft als Ganzes ausgeweitet werden. Abhängig vom Kontext kann ein Zuhörer von Hassreden jeder von uns sein. Ungeachtet dessen, als Zuhörer spielen wir alle eine relevante Rolle bei der Bestimmung, Modulation und Bekämpfung der Handlungen, die ein Sprechakt ausüben kann. Deshalb sollte ein guter Ausgangspunkt, um dieses Phänomen anzusprechen, uns einbeziehen, um als potentielle Zuhörer zu identifizieren ob und in welchem Ausmaß wir eine Hassrede als schädlich wahrnehmen und unter welchen Bedingungen eine Reaktion dazu beiträgt ihren Schaden zu verringern. Im Rahmen eines experimentellen Ansatzes zur moralischen Philosophie haben wir zur Bestätigung unserer Charakterisierung von Hassrede und ihrem Schaden zwei Forschungsarbeiten durchgeführt, um die Intuitionen gewöhnlicher Menschen zu diesen Themen zu überprüfen, welche in den Kapiteln 2 und 3 wiedergegeben werden. Kapitel 2 reproduziert einen im Mai 2023 in Scientific Reports (Springer Nature) veröffentlichten Registered Report welcher gemeinsam mit Prof. Dr. Ophelia Deroy verfasst wurde. In dieser Studie testeten wir, ob Menschen eine intrinsische Abneigung gegen verbale Gewalt im Vergleich zu anderen Arten von Hasshandlungen (nonverbale, körperliche Handlungen) haben, und in welchem Ausmaß. Da Bystander nur selten Vorfälle von Hassreden melden, und in Anbetracht des rechtlichen, theoretischen und sozialen Zögerns, sie zu bestrafen, haben wir die Hypothese aufgestellt, dass Menschen bei Hassreden nachsichtiger sind als bei nonverbalen Hasshandlungen, wenn die Absichten und Folgen die gleichen sind. Wir führten ein Experiment mit 1309 britischen Bürgern durch, die Beschreibungen von verbalen und nonverbalen Vorfällen lasen, die auf identische hasserfüllte Absichten zurückgingen und welche die gleichen Folgen hatten. Wir fragten sie, wie viel Strafe der Sprecher (Täter) erhalten sollte, wie wahrscheinlich es ist, dass sie einen solchen Vorfall anzeigen würden, und wie schädlich diese Handlungen waren. Die Ergebnisse widersprachen unseren zuvor registrierten Hypothesen und den Vorhersagen der dualen Moraltheorien, welche besagen, dass Absicht und schädliche Folgen die einzigen psychologischen Determinanten für Bestrafung sind. Stattdessen bewerteten die Teilnehmer verbale Hassvorfälle durchwegs als strafwürdiger und anzeigenswerter, und als schädlicher als nonverbale Vorfälle. Dieser Unterschied blieb auch dann bestehen, wenn wir die Szenarien so veränderten, dass die Teilnehmer wussten, dass die Zielpersonen keine negativen Konsequenzen erlitten (z. B., wenn die Zielperson taub war und deshalb die rassistische Bemerkung nicht hören konnte). Wir erklären diesen Unterschied mit dem Konzept der Handlungs-Aversion (Miller et al., 2014), im Gegensatz zur Outcome-Aversion, suggerierend, dass Laienbeobachter etwas wahrnehmen, das der Sprache inhärent ist und sie dazu veranlasst, diese als schädlicher und bestrafungs- und anzeigenswerter zu bewerten im Vergleich zu anderen nonverbalen Hasshandlungen, unabhängig von ihren Konsequenzen. Später, in Kapitel 4, interpretieren wir das intrinsische Merkmal, das von den Intuitionen der Menschen in Bezug auf die Hassrede erfasst wird, als die Fähigkeit der Sprache, zu Schaden indem man etwas sagt (d.h., einen Schaden darzustellen und ihn nicht nur zu verursachen), und verschiedene Personen gleichzeitig anzugreifen (z. B. direkte Zielpersonen und zufällige Bystander), die auch dann bestehen bleibt, wenn es den Sprechern nicht gelingt ihre direkten Ziele zu schädigen. Kapitel 3 reproduziert einen Artikel, der bei der wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift Humanities and Social Sciences Communications eingereicht wurde und derzeit begutachtet wird. Der gemeinsam mit Prof. Dr. Ophelia Deroy, Dr. Justin Sulik und Mr. Clemens von Wulffen verfasste Artikel untersucht die Wahrnehmung der Rolle von stillen oder opponierenden Bystandern bei der Verringerung des durch Hassreden verursachten Schadens. Wir gehen von zwei weit verbreiteten Annahmen aus: einer vorherrschenden passiven Haltung gegenüber Hassrede und der Berücksichtigung von Gegenreaktionen von Bystandern in der Konfrontation mit einem Fall von Hassrede als hilfreich in der Schadensminimierung, etwas, das von Regierungsbehörden, Soziologen und Philosophen betont wurde (Ayala & Vasilyeva, 2016; Langton, 2018b). Wir untersuchen, ob und unter welchen Bedingungen gewöhnliche Bürger eine stille Reaktion auf einen Vorfall mit Hassrede als Verstärkung des Schadens wahrnehmen, und wie eine Gegenrede ihn verringern kann. In zwei Online-Experimenten mit Teilnehmern aus Großbritannien, bei denen maßgeschneiderte visuelle Vignetten verwendet wurden, konnten wir empirisch nachweisen, dass die Äußerung des Widerstands von Bystandern die Wahrnehmung der Schädlichkeit solcher Vorfälle beeinflussen kann, allerdings nur als Teil einer kollektiven Reaktion: einer Reaktion, die von einer erheblichen Mehrheit der Bystander geäußert wird, was auf das Vorhandensein einer sozialen Norm gegen Hassreden schließen lässt. Experiment 1 (N=329) zeigt, dass das Erkennen der Rolle von schweigenden oder opponierenden Bystandern, die einen Vorfall mit Hassreden beobachten, davon abhängt, ob die Teilnehmer dem Kontext die aktuelle soziale Norm darüber entnehmen konnten, wie auf Hassreden zu reagieren ist. In Szenarien mit drei Bystandern erkannten die Teilnehmer, dass diejenigen, die eine Gegenreaktion zeigen, dazu beitragen, den durch die Hassrede entstandenen Schaden zu verringern, während diejenigen, die schweigen, den Schaden vergrößern. In Szenarien, in denen sich der Hassvorfall vor nur einem Bystander ereignete, was den Teilnehmern folglich nicht erlaubte, die geltende soziale Norm zu erkennen, bewerteten sie Vorfälle mit Hassreden als gleichermaßen schädlich, unabhängig davon, ob der einzige Bystander eine Gegenreaktion zeigte oder schwieg. Experiment 2 (N=269) zeigt, dass dies nicht einfach nur eine Frage der Anzahl ist, sondern eher eine der Normen: nur einstimmiger Widerspruch reduziert die öffentliche Wahrnehmung des erzeugten Schadens. Auf der Grundlage unserer Ergebnisse schlagen wir eine empirische Regel vor: Gruppenreaktionen auf Hassreden modulieren den Schaden, indem sie entweder eine nachsichtige oder eine missbilligende soziale Norm anzeigen, die die Reaktionen der Bystander leiten kann. Unsere Darstellung und unsere Ergebnisse zeigen die Notwendigkeit, individuelle Reaktionen mit kollektiven Strategien (Chater & Loewenstein, 2022) auf Hassreden und ähnliche Phänomene zu ergänzen, bei denen individuelle Bemühungen nicht auszureichen scheinen (z. B. Klimawandel oder globale Pandemien). In Kapitel 4 kehren wir zu unseren philosophischen Annahmen über Hassrede zurück, um sie im Lichte unserer empirischen Resultate zu überarbeiten. Erstens interpretieren wir die stärkere Aversion der Teilnehmer gegenüber Hassreden wie in Kapitel 2 als die Wahrnehmung, dass es ein intrinsisches Merkmal von Hassreden ist, verschiedene schädliche Handlungen durch Sprache auszuführen. Diese Handlungen verursachen nicht nur schädliche Effekte, sondern stellen selbst einen Schaden dar und können verschiedene Menschen gleichzeitig schädigen. Das ist ein Ergebnis, welches andere Hasshandlungen nicht erreichen können, und das vom Volksempfinden erfasst wird. Darüber hinaus lässt uns die Notwendigkeit für eine kollektive Reaktion und für robuste soziale Normen zur Modulation des Schadens von Hassrede, hervorgehoben in Kapitel 3, eine neue Charakterisierung von Hassrednern wagen, die Idee hinterfragend, dass diese lediglich Individuen oder „einsame Wölfe“ sind, und betrachten diese stattdessen als Mitglieder einer Gruppe. Dementsprechend verteidigen wir die Idee, dass es ein Fehler ist, Hassrede ausschließlich aus der Perspektive von individuellen Rechten auf freie Meinungsäußerung und Diskussion zu betrachten. Der Fehler ist es, schädliche Gruppensprache mit normativen — und damit sozialen — Implikationen als individuelle Angelegenheit zu behandeln. Sobald die durch Hassrede durchgeführten Handlungen, ob tatsächlich oder empfunden, mehrheitlich akzeptiert werden, besteht die Gefahr, dass sie zu politischen Optionen mutieren, die von wirtschaftlichen oder populistischen Lobbys unterstützt werden können, welche daran interessiert sind, durch soziale Konfrontation an die Macht gelangen. Auch wenn die weitere Entwicklung dieser Idee den Rahmen dieser Dissertation sprengen würde, argumentieren wir, dass schädliche Gruppenäußerungen mit normativen Ansprüchen gegenüber benachteiligter und minoritärer Gruppen nicht unter gleichen Bedingungen wie individuelle Äußerungen durch die Redefreiheit geschützt werden sollten. Darüber hinaus betonen wir die Dringlichkeit, die Annahme von Nachsicht von gewöhnlichen Bürgern gegenüber Hassrede und anderen Formen von Hass und Intoleranz in Frage zu stellen. Stattdessen müssen wir ihre Fähigkeit nutzen, den von Hassrede verursachten Schaden zu erkennen, um ihn kollektiv zu bekämpfen. Das bedeutet, wir sollten Initiativen fördern, welche schädlichen Diskursen entgegenwirken und Werte von Toleranz und Respekt für Diversität stärken, zu Gunsten einer friedlichen Koexistenz innerhalb verschiedener Gesellschaften. Abschließend fasst Kapitel 5 die wichtigsten Ergebnisse unserer Untersuchung zusammen.