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The unsettled state of America. comtemporary narratives of home and mobility in times of crisis
The unsettled state of America. comtemporary narratives of home and mobility in times of crisis
This book explores how contemporary American novelists express the malaise and sense of contingency felt in the crisis-ridden historical present through two distinct tropes in their storytelling: home and mobility. As the American nation has been confronted with an unprecedented accumulation of crises in the years since 9/11, the interrelated concepts of home and mobility have entered plots in imaginative and unique ways. This study focuses on recent novels by Paul Auster (Sunset Park), Cormac McCarthy (The Road), Dave Eggers (A Hologram for the King), Richard Ford (The Lay of the Land and Let Me Be Frank with You) and Emily St. John Mandel (Station Eleven). Crises can happen at any moment, without much warning — as the recent shock of the pandemic has made all too clear — and the works of fiction by these five authors all explore this underlying sense of threat and uncertainty through the double prism of home and mobility. The book includes excerpts from exclusive interviews with four of these authors. Christine Faber studied English and American Literature with History and Theory of Art at the University of Kent, and she received the M.A. Curating the Art Museum from the Courtauld Institute of Art. In 2020, she completed her PhD in American Literature at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich.
Contemporary American Literature, American Studies, Home, Mobility, Paul Auster, Cormac McCarthy, Dave Eggers, Richard Ford, Emily St. John Mandel
Faber, Christine
2020
English
Universitätsbibliothek der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Faber, Christine (2020): The unsettled state of America: comtemporary narratives of home and mobility in times of crisis. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty for Languages and Literatures
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Abstract

This book explores how contemporary American novelists express the malaise and sense of contingency felt in the crisis-ridden historical present through two distinct tropes in their storytelling: home and mobility. As the American nation has been confronted with an unprecedented accumulation of crises in the years since 9/11, the interrelated concepts of home and mobility have entered plots in imaginative and unique ways. This study focuses on recent novels by Paul Auster (Sunset Park), Cormac McCarthy (The Road), Dave Eggers (A Hologram for the King), Richard Ford (The Lay of the Land and Let Me Be Frank with You) and Emily St. John Mandel (Station Eleven). Crises can happen at any moment, without much warning — as the recent shock of the pandemic has made all too clear — and the works of fiction by these five authors all explore this underlying sense of threat and uncertainty through the double prism of home and mobility. The book includes excerpts from exclusive interviews with four of these authors. Christine Faber studied English and American Literature with History and Theory of Art at the University of Kent, and she received the M.A. Curating the Art Museum from the Courtauld Institute of Art. In 2020, she completed her PhD in American Literature at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich.