Logo Logo
Help
Contact
Switch language to German
Deciphering the gamma-ray sky. study of the gamma-Cygni SNR using a novel likelihood analysis technique for the MAGIC telescopes
Deciphering the gamma-ray sky. study of the gamma-Cygni SNR using a novel likelihood analysis technique for the MAGIC telescopes
This thesis presents a novel spatial likelihood analysis for Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) and its use to analyse observations of the gamma-Cygni supernova remnant (SNR) with the MAGIC telescopes, a system of two IACTs. SNRs are the prime candidate source for the origin of the galactic component of cosmic rays (CRs). These objects are sufficiently extended to be resolved with gamma-ray telescopes. This allows the determination of different acceleration regions of a source, but poses issues for the current analysis approach for IACT data. IACTs detect the Cherenkov light generated in air showers, which are cascades of energetic particle that result from the interaction of gamma-rays with the molecules in the atmosphere. Currently, the emission from a source is determined using the aperture photometry approach, in which the number of gamma-ray events from the source region is compared against a source-free background control region. In the case of superimposed emission regions, an event count cannot be attributed to one emission region. Furthermore, extended objects or objects of complex morphology make the definition of the source region a difficult task. These issues can be overcome by a spatial likelihood analysis of the skymaps of IACTs. In this approach, a user-defined source template is convolved with the instrument response functions (IRFs) and the "realistic" model fitted to the event count maps via a Poissonian likelihood fit. The data analyses of space-based gamma-ray telescopes, such as the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), are based on this technique. For IACTs the determination of the IRFs, however, is a challenging task: because the atmosphere is part of the detector, the IRFs cannot be measured in the laboratory but need to be computed from Monte-Carlo events for each observation individually. This thesis presents SkyPrism, a software package performing such an analysis on MAGIC data including the accurate determination of the IRFs. Using SkyPrism it was possible to analyse observations of the ~7000 year old gamma-Cygni SNR taken with MAGIC between 2015 and 2017. CRs are accelerated and confined in the shock region by magnetic turbulences ahead and behind the shock, making the level of turbulence an important ingredient of the acceleration process. Only a small high energetic fraction of CRs may escape the fast shocks of young SNRs (<3000 years), whereas in the case of old SNRs (>10000 years) almost all CRs have already escaped. I studied the escape of CRs from the shock into the interstellar medium using 85 hours of MAGIC data and 9 years Fermi-LAT data covering the energy range from 5 GeV to 5TeV. Using the theoretical model of the diffusive shock acceleration, I determined that the maximum energy of the CRs confined in the shock region decreases faster with the lifetime of the SNR than expected and that the level of turbulence is not constant over the lifetime of the SNR., Diese Dissertation befasst sich mit der Entwicklung einer Likelihood basierten Analyse für Daten von abbildenden Luft Cherenkov Teleskopen (IACTs) und deren Anwendung auf Beobachtungen des gamma-Cygni Supernova Überrestes mit den MAGIC Teleskopen, einem System von zwei IACTs. Nach heutigem Wissensstand wird der galaktische Anteil der kosmischen Strahlung (CR), relativistischer Teilchen, welche hochenergetische Gammastrahlung erzeugen, hauptsächlich in den Schockwellen der Überreste von Supernovae (SNR) beschleunigt. Diese Objekte sind ausgedehnt genug, sodass sie sich auch mit Gammastrahlen Teleskopen auflösen lassen. Dies ermöglicht einerseits eine genauere Untersuchung der verschiedenen Beschleunigungsregionen innerhalb des Objekts, stellt andererseits jedoch eine Herausforderung für die aktuellen Analysemethoden von IACTs dar. IACTs detektieren das Cherenkov Licht von Luftschauern, Teilchenkaskaden, die aus der Wechselwirkung von Gammastrahlung mit Luftmolekülen resultieren. Aktuell wird die Intensität einer Quelle aus den Daten von IACTs mittels der Apertur-Photometrie ermittelt. Dazu wird die Anzahl der detektierten Gammastrahlen-Ereignisse aus einem Gebiet um die Quelle mit der Anzahl an Ereignissen aus einem gleichgroßen Kontrollbereich ohne Quelle ermittelt. Überlagern sich jedoch Emissionsregionen, so lässt sich nicht bestimmen, zu welcher Region ein Ereignis zählt. Sehr ausgedehnte Quellen oder Objekte mit komplexer Morphologie stellen zudem ein Problem hinsichtlich der Wahl der Quellregion dar. Durch eine räumliche Likelihood Analyse auf der Basis von Himmelskarten von IACTs lassen sich die Schwierigkeiten vermeiden. Dabei wird eine benutzerdefinierte Morphologie mit der Instrumentenantwort (IRF) gefaltet und dieses "realistische" Quellmodel mittels eines Poisson-Likelihood Fits an die Messdaten angepasst. Bei satellitengestützten Gamma-Teleskopen wie dem Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), wird diese Methode bereits angewandt. Die Schwierigkeit für IACTs ist die Bestimmung der IRF. Da die Atmosphäre ein Bestandteil des IACTs ist, kann die IRF nicht vorab im Labor ermittelt werden, sondern muss mit Hilfe von Monte-Carlo Simulationen für jede Beobachtung individuell bestimmt werden. Diese Arbeit präsentiert das Software Paket SkyPrism, das eine solche Analyse inklusive der Bestimmung der IRFs, für die MAGIC Teleskope durchführt. Mit Hilfe von SkyPrism konnten MAGIC Beobachtungsdaten von dem ca. 7000 Jahren alten gamma-Cygni SNR analysiert werden. Während des Beschleunigungsvorgangs in SNR Schockwellen streut die CR an magnetischen Turbulenzen vor und hinter dem Schock, wodurch der Grad der Turbulenzen ein wichtiger Bestandteil des Beschleunigungsvorgangs wird. Aus den schnellen Schockwellen von jüngeren SNR (< 3000 Jahren) entkommt nur ein kleiner Anteil der CR, während bei älteren SNR (>10000 Jahre) bereits nahezu die gesamte CR der Schockwelle entkommen ist und keine Beschleunigung mehr stattfindet. Die Beobachtungen mit den MAGIC Teleskopen (85 Stunden Beobachtungszeit) und dem Fermi-LAT (9 Jahre Daten) über einen Energiebereich von 5 GeV bis 5 TeV ermöglichten zum ersten Mal eine Untersuchung, wie die CR der Schockwelle eines SNR ins interstellare Medium entkommt. Mittels eines theoretischen Models für die Schockbeschleunigung konnte ermittelt werden, dass die maximale Energie, zu der die CR beschleunigt und im Schockbereich gehalten werden kann, schneller mit der Lebensdauer des SNR abnimmt als erwartet und der Grad an Turbulenzen über die Lebensdauer des SNR nicht konstant sein kann.
Gamma rays, Data Analysis, Imaging Cherenkov Telescopes, Supernova remnants, Cosmic rays, Interstellar medium
Strzys, Marcel Constantin
2020
English
Universitätsbibliothek der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Strzys, Marcel Constantin (2020): Deciphering the gamma-ray sky: study of the gamma-Cygni SNR using a novel likelihood analysis technique for the MAGIC telescopes. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty of Physics
[img]
Preview
PDF
Strzys_Marcel_Constantin.pdf

7MB

Abstract

This thesis presents a novel spatial likelihood analysis for Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) and its use to analyse observations of the gamma-Cygni supernova remnant (SNR) with the MAGIC telescopes, a system of two IACTs. SNRs are the prime candidate source for the origin of the galactic component of cosmic rays (CRs). These objects are sufficiently extended to be resolved with gamma-ray telescopes. This allows the determination of different acceleration regions of a source, but poses issues for the current analysis approach for IACT data. IACTs detect the Cherenkov light generated in air showers, which are cascades of energetic particle that result from the interaction of gamma-rays with the molecules in the atmosphere. Currently, the emission from a source is determined using the aperture photometry approach, in which the number of gamma-ray events from the source region is compared against a source-free background control region. In the case of superimposed emission regions, an event count cannot be attributed to one emission region. Furthermore, extended objects or objects of complex morphology make the definition of the source region a difficult task. These issues can be overcome by a spatial likelihood analysis of the skymaps of IACTs. In this approach, a user-defined source template is convolved with the instrument response functions (IRFs) and the "realistic" model fitted to the event count maps via a Poissonian likelihood fit. The data analyses of space-based gamma-ray telescopes, such as the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), are based on this technique. For IACTs the determination of the IRFs, however, is a challenging task: because the atmosphere is part of the detector, the IRFs cannot be measured in the laboratory but need to be computed from Monte-Carlo events for each observation individually. This thesis presents SkyPrism, a software package performing such an analysis on MAGIC data including the accurate determination of the IRFs. Using SkyPrism it was possible to analyse observations of the ~7000 year old gamma-Cygni SNR taken with MAGIC between 2015 and 2017. CRs are accelerated and confined in the shock region by magnetic turbulences ahead and behind the shock, making the level of turbulence an important ingredient of the acceleration process. Only a small high energetic fraction of CRs may escape the fast shocks of young SNRs (<3000 years), whereas in the case of old SNRs (>10000 years) almost all CRs have already escaped. I studied the escape of CRs from the shock into the interstellar medium using 85 hours of MAGIC data and 9 years Fermi-LAT data covering the energy range from 5 GeV to 5TeV. Using the theoretical model of the diffusive shock acceleration, I determined that the maximum energy of the CRs confined in the shock region decreases faster with the lifetime of the SNR than expected and that the level of turbulence is not constant over the lifetime of the SNR.

Abstract

Diese Dissertation befasst sich mit der Entwicklung einer Likelihood basierten Analyse für Daten von abbildenden Luft Cherenkov Teleskopen (IACTs) und deren Anwendung auf Beobachtungen des gamma-Cygni Supernova Überrestes mit den MAGIC Teleskopen, einem System von zwei IACTs. Nach heutigem Wissensstand wird der galaktische Anteil der kosmischen Strahlung (CR), relativistischer Teilchen, welche hochenergetische Gammastrahlung erzeugen, hauptsächlich in den Schockwellen der Überreste von Supernovae (SNR) beschleunigt. Diese Objekte sind ausgedehnt genug, sodass sie sich auch mit Gammastrahlen Teleskopen auflösen lassen. Dies ermöglicht einerseits eine genauere Untersuchung der verschiedenen Beschleunigungsregionen innerhalb des Objekts, stellt andererseits jedoch eine Herausforderung für die aktuellen Analysemethoden von IACTs dar. IACTs detektieren das Cherenkov Licht von Luftschauern, Teilchenkaskaden, die aus der Wechselwirkung von Gammastrahlung mit Luftmolekülen resultieren. Aktuell wird die Intensität einer Quelle aus den Daten von IACTs mittels der Apertur-Photometrie ermittelt. Dazu wird die Anzahl der detektierten Gammastrahlen-Ereignisse aus einem Gebiet um die Quelle mit der Anzahl an Ereignissen aus einem gleichgroßen Kontrollbereich ohne Quelle ermittelt. Überlagern sich jedoch Emissionsregionen, so lässt sich nicht bestimmen, zu welcher Region ein Ereignis zählt. Sehr ausgedehnte Quellen oder Objekte mit komplexer Morphologie stellen zudem ein Problem hinsichtlich der Wahl der Quellregion dar. Durch eine räumliche Likelihood Analyse auf der Basis von Himmelskarten von IACTs lassen sich die Schwierigkeiten vermeiden. Dabei wird eine benutzerdefinierte Morphologie mit der Instrumentenantwort (IRF) gefaltet und dieses "realistische" Quellmodel mittels eines Poisson-Likelihood Fits an die Messdaten angepasst. Bei satellitengestützten Gamma-Teleskopen wie dem Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), wird diese Methode bereits angewandt. Die Schwierigkeit für IACTs ist die Bestimmung der IRF. Da die Atmosphäre ein Bestandteil des IACTs ist, kann die IRF nicht vorab im Labor ermittelt werden, sondern muss mit Hilfe von Monte-Carlo Simulationen für jede Beobachtung individuell bestimmt werden. Diese Arbeit präsentiert das Software Paket SkyPrism, das eine solche Analyse inklusive der Bestimmung der IRFs, für die MAGIC Teleskope durchführt. Mit Hilfe von SkyPrism konnten MAGIC Beobachtungsdaten von dem ca. 7000 Jahren alten gamma-Cygni SNR analysiert werden. Während des Beschleunigungsvorgangs in SNR Schockwellen streut die CR an magnetischen Turbulenzen vor und hinter dem Schock, wodurch der Grad der Turbulenzen ein wichtiger Bestandteil des Beschleunigungsvorgangs wird. Aus den schnellen Schockwellen von jüngeren SNR (< 3000 Jahren) entkommt nur ein kleiner Anteil der CR, während bei älteren SNR (>10000 Jahre) bereits nahezu die gesamte CR der Schockwelle entkommen ist und keine Beschleunigung mehr stattfindet. Die Beobachtungen mit den MAGIC Teleskopen (85 Stunden Beobachtungszeit) und dem Fermi-LAT (9 Jahre Daten) über einen Energiebereich von 5 GeV bis 5 TeV ermöglichten zum ersten Mal eine Untersuchung, wie die CR der Schockwelle eines SNR ins interstellare Medium entkommt. Mittels eines theoretischen Models für die Schockbeschleunigung konnte ermittelt werden, dass die maximale Energie, zu der die CR beschleunigt und im Schockbereich gehalten werden kann, schneller mit der Lebensdauer des SNR abnimmt als erwartet und der Grad an Turbulenzen über die Lebensdauer des SNR nicht konstant sein kann.