Logo Logo
Help
Contact
Switch language to German
Mechanisms of photosynthetic high-light tolerance. synechocystis sp. PCC6803 as an experimental platform
Mechanisms of photosynthetic high-light tolerance. synechocystis sp. PCC6803 as an experimental platform
Plants and cyanobacteria use a process called oxygenic photosynthesis to convert light into chemical energy, which in turn sustains most life on Earth. Oxygenic photosynthesis is an elaborate interplay of multi-subunit transmembrane protein complexes, two of which, the photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII), harvest light energy and use it to catalyze photochemical redox reactions. The PSII-catalyzed reaction results in water oxidation and the eponymous release of molecular oxygen, while the PSI-driven reaction results in reduction of ferredoxin. These light-driven enzymes have evolved once and are being used by all oxygenic photosynthesizers with little to no structural variation. Photosynthesis is commonly assumed to have evolved under extremely low light intensities originally. In order to conquer elevated-light-intensity environments it had to be supported by evolution of numerous protective mechanisms, however. One of these mechanisms is called cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI, which is assumed to serves as energy valve and balancing agent. CEF recycles surplus electrons until acceptor molecules become available, resulting in formation of a proton gradient and consequent induction of excitation energy dissipation mechanisms. The proton gradient also is harvested for ATP synthesis, and CEF can be employed to adjust proton gradient formation to cellular ATP demands without generation of reductive equivalents. CEF is channeled through several, partially redundant routes, one of which is characterized by its sensitivity to the antibiotic antimycin-A (AA). AA-sensitive CEF is common to most cyanobacteria and plants, but remains poorly understood to date. Two plant components of AA-sensitive CEF termed PGR5 and PGRL1 have been identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), but their mode of action and actual involvement in CEF and/or its regulation is still elusive. We have established a prokaryotic expression system for plant PGR proteins based on the cyanobacterial model organism Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 (Synechocystis) to, upon deletion of endogenous PGR5, assess the function of Arabidopsis PGRL1 and PGR5 on a presumably orthogonal platform. We could demonstrate functional complementation of the Synechocystis PGR5 knockout mutant by the plant PGRL1*PGR5 couple, confirmed the system to be suitable for functional assays with different PGR protein isoform, and identified a new Synechocystis component that apparently fulfils parts of the functional role of plant PGRL1 (synPGRL1-LIKE Sll1217). Besides offering a new approach to study this known light stress adaptive mechanism, we could establish an experimental pipeline to evolve new strategies of high-light-intensity tolerance in Synechocystis and confirmed the adaptive value of two candidate mutations, one of which seemingly confers increased CEF activity. CEF upregulation by means of evolution and genetic engineering was found to result in similar degrees of high-light tolerance, demonstrating feasibility and power of adaptive evolution, and suggesting its great potential as optimization tool for photosynthetic research and production strains., Pflanzen und Cyanobakterien nutzen oxygene Photosynthese, um Licht in chemische Energie zu konvertieren, welche den Großteil des Lebens auf der Erde versorgt. Zwei an der oxygenen Photosynthese beteiligte, membranständige Multi-Protein-Komplexe, die Photosysteme I und II (PSI und PSII), absorbieren Lichtenergie und nutzen diese um Redox-Reaktionen zu katalysieren. Dabei oxidiert PSII Wasser, was zur namensgebenden Freisetzung von Sauerstoff führt, während PSI Ferredoxin reduziert. Diese lichtgetriebenen Enzyme wurden einmalig evolviert und werden fast unverändert von allen oxygen-photosynthetischen Organismen genutzt. Es wird angenommen, dass Photosynthese ursprünglich unter extrem niedrigen Lichtintensitäten evolvierte. Wachstum unter erhöhten Lichtintensitäten setzte die Entwicklung neuer Schutzmechanismen voraus. Einer dieser Mechanismen ist zyklischer Elektronentransport (ZET) um PSI, welcher überschüssige Anregungsenergie abführt und an der Balancierung zellulärer Energie- und Redox-Träger beteiligt ist. ZET führt „überschüssige“ Elektronen zurück zur PSI-Donorseite, bis Akzeptormoleküle verfügbar werden. Dabei werden ein Protonengradient aufgebaut und Energiedissipationsmechanismen induziert. Es existieren mehrere, partiell überlappende ZET-Routen, von denen eine empfindlich gegenüber Antimycin A (AA) ist. AA-sensitiver ZET existiert in den meisten Cyanobakterien und Pflanzen, ist aber bis heute kaum verstanden. Zwei pflanzliche Komponenten dieser ZET-Route, PGRL1 und PGR5, wurden in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) identifiziert, aber ihre Funktion im ZET und/oder seiner Regulation sind umstritten. Zu deren funktionaler Analyse wurde ein prokaryotisches Expressionssystem für pflanzliche PGR-Proteine im Cyanobakterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 (Synechocystis) etabliert. Deletion des Synechocystis-eigenen PGR5 schaffte dabei einen physiologisch orthogonalen Hintergrund, in dem eine funktionelle Komplementation der Synechocystis pgr5 Mutante durch das pflanzliche PGRL1*PGR5-Pärchen gezeigt, und die Eignung unseres Systems für die funktionale Analyse verschiedener PGR-Protein-Isoformen bestätigt werden konnte. Zudem wurde eine neue ZET-Komponente in Synechocystis identifiziert, die teilweise die Funktion pflanzlichen PGRL1 übernehmen kann (synPGRL1-LIKE Sll1217). Neben diesem neuen Ansatz zur Erforschung von ZET konnten wir einen experimentellen Aufbau zur Evolution neuer Strategien zur Erhöhung der Lichtstresstoleranz etablieren. Zudem konnte der adaptive Mehrwert zweier Kandidatenmutationen experimentell bestätigt werden, von denen eine erhöhte ZET-Aktivität hervorruft. Die künstliche Anregung von ZET-Aktivität durch gentechnische und evolutive Ansätze resultierte in einer vergleichbaren Erhöhung der Starklicht-Toleranz, was die Möglichkeiten und Umsetzbarkeit adaptiver Evolutionsexperimente demonstriert, und deren Potential als Optimierungswerkzeug für die Photosyntheseforschung und bakterielle Produktionsstämme verdeutlicht.
Cyanobacteria, Adaptive Laboratory Evolution, Cyclic Electron Flow, High Light Tolerance, Photosynthesis
Dann, Marcel
2020
English
Universitätsbibliothek der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Dann, Marcel (2020): Mechanisms of photosynthetic high-light tolerance: synechocystis sp. PCC6803 as an experimental platform. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty of Biology
[img]
Preview
PDF
Dann_Marcel.pdf

13MB

Abstract

Plants and cyanobacteria use a process called oxygenic photosynthesis to convert light into chemical energy, which in turn sustains most life on Earth. Oxygenic photosynthesis is an elaborate interplay of multi-subunit transmembrane protein complexes, two of which, the photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII), harvest light energy and use it to catalyze photochemical redox reactions. The PSII-catalyzed reaction results in water oxidation and the eponymous release of molecular oxygen, while the PSI-driven reaction results in reduction of ferredoxin. These light-driven enzymes have evolved once and are being used by all oxygenic photosynthesizers with little to no structural variation. Photosynthesis is commonly assumed to have evolved under extremely low light intensities originally. In order to conquer elevated-light-intensity environments it had to be supported by evolution of numerous protective mechanisms, however. One of these mechanisms is called cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI, which is assumed to serves as energy valve and balancing agent. CEF recycles surplus electrons until acceptor molecules become available, resulting in formation of a proton gradient and consequent induction of excitation energy dissipation mechanisms. The proton gradient also is harvested for ATP synthesis, and CEF can be employed to adjust proton gradient formation to cellular ATP demands without generation of reductive equivalents. CEF is channeled through several, partially redundant routes, one of which is characterized by its sensitivity to the antibiotic antimycin-A (AA). AA-sensitive CEF is common to most cyanobacteria and plants, but remains poorly understood to date. Two plant components of AA-sensitive CEF termed PGR5 and PGRL1 have been identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), but their mode of action and actual involvement in CEF and/or its regulation is still elusive. We have established a prokaryotic expression system for plant PGR proteins based on the cyanobacterial model organism Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 (Synechocystis) to, upon deletion of endogenous PGR5, assess the function of Arabidopsis PGRL1 and PGR5 on a presumably orthogonal platform. We could demonstrate functional complementation of the Synechocystis PGR5 knockout mutant by the plant PGRL1*PGR5 couple, confirmed the system to be suitable for functional assays with different PGR protein isoform, and identified a new Synechocystis component that apparently fulfils parts of the functional role of plant PGRL1 (synPGRL1-LIKE Sll1217). Besides offering a new approach to study this known light stress adaptive mechanism, we could establish an experimental pipeline to evolve new strategies of high-light-intensity tolerance in Synechocystis and confirmed the adaptive value of two candidate mutations, one of which seemingly confers increased CEF activity. CEF upregulation by means of evolution and genetic engineering was found to result in similar degrees of high-light tolerance, demonstrating feasibility and power of adaptive evolution, and suggesting its great potential as optimization tool for photosynthetic research and production strains.

Abstract

Pflanzen und Cyanobakterien nutzen oxygene Photosynthese, um Licht in chemische Energie zu konvertieren, welche den Großteil des Lebens auf der Erde versorgt. Zwei an der oxygenen Photosynthese beteiligte, membranständige Multi-Protein-Komplexe, die Photosysteme I und II (PSI und PSII), absorbieren Lichtenergie und nutzen diese um Redox-Reaktionen zu katalysieren. Dabei oxidiert PSII Wasser, was zur namensgebenden Freisetzung von Sauerstoff führt, während PSI Ferredoxin reduziert. Diese lichtgetriebenen Enzyme wurden einmalig evolviert und werden fast unverändert von allen oxygen-photosynthetischen Organismen genutzt. Es wird angenommen, dass Photosynthese ursprünglich unter extrem niedrigen Lichtintensitäten evolvierte. Wachstum unter erhöhten Lichtintensitäten setzte die Entwicklung neuer Schutzmechanismen voraus. Einer dieser Mechanismen ist zyklischer Elektronentransport (ZET) um PSI, welcher überschüssige Anregungsenergie abführt und an der Balancierung zellulärer Energie- und Redox-Träger beteiligt ist. ZET führt „überschüssige“ Elektronen zurück zur PSI-Donorseite, bis Akzeptormoleküle verfügbar werden. Dabei werden ein Protonengradient aufgebaut und Energiedissipationsmechanismen induziert. Es existieren mehrere, partiell überlappende ZET-Routen, von denen eine empfindlich gegenüber Antimycin A (AA) ist. AA-sensitiver ZET existiert in den meisten Cyanobakterien und Pflanzen, ist aber bis heute kaum verstanden. Zwei pflanzliche Komponenten dieser ZET-Route, PGRL1 und PGR5, wurden in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) identifiziert, aber ihre Funktion im ZET und/oder seiner Regulation sind umstritten. Zu deren funktionaler Analyse wurde ein prokaryotisches Expressionssystem für pflanzliche PGR-Proteine im Cyanobakterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 (Synechocystis) etabliert. Deletion des Synechocystis-eigenen PGR5 schaffte dabei einen physiologisch orthogonalen Hintergrund, in dem eine funktionelle Komplementation der Synechocystis pgr5 Mutante durch das pflanzliche PGRL1*PGR5-Pärchen gezeigt, und die Eignung unseres Systems für die funktionale Analyse verschiedener PGR-Protein-Isoformen bestätigt werden konnte. Zudem wurde eine neue ZET-Komponente in Synechocystis identifiziert, die teilweise die Funktion pflanzlichen PGRL1 übernehmen kann (synPGRL1-LIKE Sll1217). Neben diesem neuen Ansatz zur Erforschung von ZET konnten wir einen experimentellen Aufbau zur Evolution neuer Strategien zur Erhöhung der Lichtstresstoleranz etablieren. Zudem konnte der adaptive Mehrwert zweier Kandidatenmutationen experimentell bestätigt werden, von denen eine erhöhte ZET-Aktivität hervorruft. Die künstliche Anregung von ZET-Aktivität durch gentechnische und evolutive Ansätze resultierte in einer vergleichbaren Erhöhung der Starklicht-Toleranz, was die Möglichkeiten und Umsetzbarkeit adaptiver Evolutionsexperimente demonstriert, und deren Potential als Optimierungswerkzeug für die Photosyntheseforschung und bakterielle Produktionsstämme verdeutlicht.