Logo Logo
Help
Contact
Switch language to German
Shackled memories and elusive discourses?. colonial slavery and the contemporary cultural and artistic imagination in South Africa
Shackled memories and elusive discourses?. colonial slavery and the contemporary cultural and artistic imagination in South Africa
Much has been made about South Africa’s transition from histories of colonialism, slavery and most recently apartheid. “Memory” as a descriptive features quite prominently in the definition of the country’s reckoning with its pasts. While there has been an outpouring of academic essays, anthologies and other full length texts which study this transition, most have focused on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). This study links with that research in its concern with South Africa’s past and the meaning-making processes attendant to it, but reads specifically memory activity which pertains to colonial slavery as practiced predominantly in the western Cape for three centuries by the British and the Dutch. Theoretically, the thesis engages closely with the vast terrain of interdisciplinary memory studies which characterises the Humanities and Social Sciences. It reads memory as one way of processing the past, and interprets a variety of cultural, literary and filmic texts to ascertain the particular experiences in relation to slave pasts being fashioned, processed and disseminated. The project studies various negotiations of raced and gendered identities in creative and other and other public spaces in contemporary South Africa, by being particularly attentive to the encoding of consciousness about the country’s slave past. Most usefully, many theorists of memory, Toni Morrison and Dorothy Pennington among them, suggest that this consciousness of the past, and the activity it engenders, is best thought of in shapeshifting forms. Morrison’s rememory, and Pennington’s helix-shaped memory are useful for the reading of creative performances of slave memory thematically and temporally. The introduction opens the inquiry by surveying various strands and themes of the collective memory and history debates of previous decades. In this regard, this beginning is concerned less with pinpointing the exact differences between memory and history, an arguably impossible task given the contestation around the definition, than with ascertaining the locations of specific forms of historical consciousness in the creative imaginary. Much of the material surveyed across disciplines attributes to memory, and popular historymaking, a dialogue between past and present whilst ascribing sense to both the eras and their relationship. In this sense, then, memory is active, entailing a personal relationship with the past which acts as a mediator of reality on a day to day basis. Chapter one analyses the larger memory process in South Africa over the last nine years since the onset of democracy. In the nation-building exercise the relationship between the sites of historical consciousness from different eras finds expression in dissonant localities. Why is it, for example, that so little is known publicly about enslavement as one of the formative systems of a modern South Africa? At the same time, the larger processes of memory-making, mostly linked to the TRC, have engendered a variety of explorations into the possible meanings and experiences of past eras. It also left other experiences as unspeakable. This chapter unpacks the manner in which the narration of apartheid atrocities enabled the excavation of slave presences, together with a questioning of why this unearthing of slave rememory has been so belated. Chapter two reads some of the ways in which a slave past enters into current discourses through which racial identities are being reformatted and renegotiated. It examines the manifestations of this opening up of identity which Kopano Ratele has suggested carries the possibilities of freedom. The chapter reads three processes through which racial belonging is refashioned. First, it analyses the various strands of the project which can be seen to deconstruct the legacy of white racial purity claims until recently. I argue that although superficially the location of indigenous Khoi and slave ancestry within the lineages of apartheid’s ruling families to work similarly to the now widespread white South African laying claim to an indigenous foremother, these nonetheless carry different implications. The differences are uncovered through paying attention to how context alters the ensuing meanings and ends to which they work. It then proceeds from this to examine some of the activity within the terrain of coloured identities. Under previous governments, coloured subjects were legally trapped in discourses of racial mixing. In the western Cape, the communities are descendents of enslaved peoples. The chapter demonstrates how two impulses, one to re-inhabit colouredness as an identity that is historicised and worked through; and another which disclaims it in favour of a Khoi indigeneity with admitted slave foreparentage, work to very similar ends. To the extent that coloured identities and Khoi assertions are inhabited in a variety of ways which jarring political effects, the chapter focuses on two specific collective articulations of these identities. Chapter three analyses representations of Sara Bartmann, the most famous slave and Khoi woman from South Africa. The section addresses itself to representations of this particular subject based on the proliferation of academic, literary and filmic material globally which seeks to represent her. Immortalised under the slur “Hottentot Venus” she has been made to function as icon for a variety of ends since enslavement, transportation to Europe and exhibition in London and Paris, her dissection, and the preservation of her brain and genitalia by France’s foremost anatomist of the nineteenth century in the name of science. The chapter is concerned with the fraught politics of representing her in ways which do not recreate earlier nineteenth century, and more recent misguided twentieth century, tropes which objectify her b y placing her outside history. Given that most of the material which references her name, usually as “Hottentot Venus” uses her as illustration for someone else, how do narratives which dissociate themselves from this legacy represent her? In this chapter three literary texts are read as charting a variety of representations of Bartmann which suggest refreshing alternatives. I argue here that they partake in Black feminist representation politics. The fourth and final chapter examines the crevices of memory, and how it links with representations of diaspora for the descendants of slaves in the western Cape. Diasporic sensibility finds exploration as theme among those descendants of the enshackled who identify as “Cape Malay” or “Cape Muslim”. Also classified coloured in the previous dispensations, these identities cluster around slave foreparentage transported from South East Asia. This section of the thesis analyses various environments where memory signals a diasporic articulation. Given that memory is seen to “linger in forms which do not easily give up the story”, as Nkiru Nzegwu asserts in the introduction, various texts are read to work the service of processing diasporic memory. In this chapter, visual installations, the visibility and negotiations signalled through “Cape Malay food”, and the sense of belonging signalled through Islam as “high cultured” religion in the first novel on slavery written by a descendant of slaves in South Africa, are read for ways in which they link to a making sense of slave pasts for these communities. The emerging pattern also points to the manner in which a sophisticated flirtation with diaspora is able to, at the same time, anchor in another locality. The Cape Malay/Capetonian Muslim diasporic artistic activity read here complicates some of the standard, taken-for-granted, tenets of diaspora theory, and most of its meanings are only uncovered when an assortment of diasporic theoretical tools are brought to bear on the texts. In the conclusion, the findings of the various chapters are brought together with a view to examining the emerging, larger picture. The primary material examined betrays a high level of intertextuality, and resists casting itself in modes which suggest “purist” readings. This appears particularly apt for interpreting the crevices of memory, a project which itself is always complex, and in helix-fashion moving forwards at the same time that it looks in on itself. The ending makes the contribution of this study to studies on the memory process explicit, and finds its timing opportune as the democracy matures and possibly embarks on another stream of projects. This accident of timing will clearly have implications for the study of memory processes in contemporary South Africa. Finally, it suggests some “absences” in this project, the first full-length examination of the terrain of slave re-memory in contemporary South Africa, and concludes by suggesting evolving configurations, as slave memory becomes more public, for future scholastic investigations., Es ist schon viel über den Wandel von Kolonalismus und Sklaverei in Südafrika bis zum Ende der Apartheid geforscht und publiziert worden. In diesen Auseinandersetzungen mit Geschichte und Vergagenheid Südafrikas fungiert der Begriff der „Erinnerung“ als zentrales Konzept. Zwar gibt es inzwischen zahlreiche Essays, Anthologien und wissenschaftliche Texte, die den geschichlichen Wandel untersuchen, doch konzentrierten sich diese zumeist au die Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). Meine Forschungsarbeit steht im Kontext diverser Untersuchungen über Südafrikas Vergagenheit und deren jeweiliger Erklärungsansätze. Zugleich aber interpetiert sie spezifische Formen der kollektiven Erinnerung, die vor allem die durch Briten und Holländer praktizierte Sklaverei in westlichen Kap zum Thema haben. Theoretisch ist diese Arbeit im weiten Feld der interdisziplinären memory studies verortet, die vor allem die angelsächsischen Geisteswissenschaften und Sozialwissenschaften heute prägen. Diese Studie betrachtet Erinnerung als eine Art und Weise der Auseinandersetzung mit der Vergangenheit. Dabei interpretiert sie vielfältige kulturelle, literarische und filmische Texte, die die besondere Erfahrungen der Sklaverei bearbeiten und untersucht, auf welche Weise diese Texte eine Geschichte der Sklaverei entwickeln, bearbeiten und verbreiten. Dieses Projekt untersucht verschiedene Positionen von „rassisch“ und geschlechtich markieterten Identitäten sowohl in kreativen als auch anderen öffentlichen Räumen des gegenwärtigen Südafrika. Besondere Aufmerksamkeit wird hierbei der fortflaufenden Entfaltung sowie Weiterentwicklung des Wissens über die Geschichte der Sklaverei dieses Landes gewidmet. Hilfreicherweise haben viele TheoretikerInnen des Konzepts „Erinnerung“, so auch Toni Morrison und Dorothy Pennington, vorgeschlangen, dass das Bewusstwerden der und das Bewusstein von der Vergangenheit ebenso wie die daraus resultierenden Hadlungsoptionen am besten als flexible Prozesse verstanden warden können. Morrison Konzept der Wieder-Erinnerung und Penningtons Vorstellung von Erinnerung in Form einer Helix ist gerade für das Lesen kreativer Darstellungen, die sich der Sklaverei erinnern, sehr hilfreich. Die Einleitung meiner Arbeit gibt einen ersten Einblick in verschiendene. Strömungen und Themenbereiche all jener Untersuchungen, die sich mit kollektiver Erinnerung un den historischen Debatten der vergangenen Dekaden befassen. Angesichts der zahlreichten Auseinandersetzungen um genaue Definitionen ist die Einleitung weniger al seine Darstellung der konzeptuellen Unterschiede zwischen Erinnerung und Geschichte zu verstehen, sondern untersucht vilemehr die Verortung der spezifischen Formen von historischem Wissen im Rahmen von kreativen Imagination. Das meiste Material, das in dieser Studie die Disziplinen übergreifend untersucht wird, steht in Bezug zu Erinnerungspolitiken, populärer Geschichtsschreibung und einem Dialog zwischen Vergangenheit und Gegenwart. Sowohl der Verbindung von Gegenwart und Vergagenheit, als auch jedem Bereich für sich genommen, ist Bedeutung eingeschrieben. In diesem Sinne stellt Erinnerung eine subjektieve Verbindung mit der Vergangenheit her und stiftet als soche aktiv Bedeutungen im Alltag. Kapitel I analysiert weitreichende Erinnerungsprozesse in Südafrika der lezten 9 Jahre seit Beginn der Demokratie. Gegenwärtige nation building Prozesse spiegeln das oft sehr unterschiedliche Erleben von Vergangenheit wider; Vergangenheiten, die auf sehr verschiedene und oft unvereinbare Weise in das nation building einfließen. Es stellt sich die Frage, warum in der Öffentlichkeit so wenig über die Sklaverei und ihre grundlegende Bedeutung für das moderne Südafrika bekannt ist. Im Zusammenhang mit umfassenderen Prozessen der Erinnerungsarbeit, welche meist mit der Arbeit der Truth and Reconciliation Commission einhergehen, treten unterschiedliche Bedeutungsmöglichkeiten und Erfahrungen der Vergangenheit zu Tage. Dieses Kapitel entfaltet die Art und Weise, in der die Erzählung von den Grausamkeiten der Apartheid leztlich auch die „Ausgrabung“ der Sklaverei ermöglichte. Darüber hinaus widmet sich dieses Kapitel auch der Frage, warum das Aufdecken der Erinnerung as die Sklaverei so lange dauerte. Kapitel II interpretiert discursive Praktiken in denen die Vergangenheit der Sklaverei Identitäten entlang des Konstrukts „Rasse“ entwickelt, reformiert und verhandelt. Es untersucht, dem Vorschlag Kopano Ratele folgend, in wieweit der Prozess einer Öffnung von Identität die Möglichkeit von Freiheit in sich trägt. In diesem Sinne analysiert das Kapitel drei Arten und Weisen, in denen kollektive Zugehörigkeit rund um das Konstrukt „Rasse“ völlig neu entwickelt wird. Zuerst werden die verschiedenen dieser Prozesse entwickelt, die als Dekonstruktion des bis heute wirksammen Erbes weißer „rassischer“ Reinheit betrachtet werden können. Im Kontext dieser Dekonstruction von „Weißheit“ lassen sich zwei oberflächlich ähnliche, aber in ihrer politischen Situiertheit letzlich sehr verschiedene Entwicklungen ausmachen. Dem zunehmend dominanten Diskurs weißer SüdafrikanerInnen, die sich mehr und mehr auf ihre Khoi- und Sklaven-Vorfahren beziehen, wird die Forschung von Ramola Naidoo gegenübergestellt. Auch sie weist nach, dass die moisten der führenden Familien des Apartheidsystems versklavte Vormütter haben, doch die Differenzen zwischen beiden Ansätzen werden deutlich, sobald man berücksichtig, wie der jeweilige Kontext bedeutungs-verändernd wirkt und damit letzlich verschiedene politische Implikationen hat. Darauf folgen werden einege der Aktivitäten innerhalb von coloured identities-Praktiken untersucht. Unter den alten Regierungen waren so genannte Farbige jene Menschen, welche aufgrund der juristischen Definition im Diskurs des „rassischen Mischens“ gefangen waren. Im western Kap stamen solchermaßen begründete. Gemeinschaften von ehermaligen Sklaven ab. Das Kapitel II zeigt, wie zwei identitäre Bewegungen letztlich auf das Gleiche hinauslaufen, nämlich die Ablehnung der Zuschreibung des „Farbig-Seins“ als minderwertige Konsequenz von „rassischer Vermischung“. Die eine Seite be- und erlebt colouredness als historische, sich verändernde und noch immer zu bearbeitende Identität, die andere Seite erkennt die Versklavung der Vorfehren an und weist die Indentität coloured zugunsten einer positive Bezugnahme auf die eigenen Khoi-Ursprünge zurück. Coloured identities und Khoi-Abstammung werden auf so unterschiedliche und oft so unstimmige Weise gelebt, dass sich dieses Kapitel lediglich auf diese zwei soeben dargestellen Formen kollektiver Identitäten konsentriet. Kapitel III untersucht Darstellungsformen von Sara Bartmann, der wohl berühmtesten Sklavin und Khoifrau as Südafrika. Dieser Teil der Arbeit bezieht sich auf jenes akademiesche, literatische und filmische Material, das im Zuge eines weltweit zunehmenden Interesses an Sara Bartmann, versucht sie zu repräsentieren. Seit ihrer Versklavung, ihrer Überführung nach Europa und ihrer Ausstellung in London und Paris, seit ihrer Autopsie und der Konservierung ihres Gehirns und ihrer Genitalien im Namen der Wissenschaft durch Frankreichs berühmtesten Anatomen des 19 Jahrhunderts, wurde Sara Bartmann unter dem Begriff „Hottentoten-Venus“ zur unsterblichen Ikone und dient bis heute verschiedenen Zwecken und Interessen. Die besondere Aufmerksamkeit liegt in diesem Kapitel darauf, Sara Bartmann weder auf jene Art und Weise zu repräsentieren, wie dies im frühen 19. Jahrhundert geschah, noch mit jenen Tropen des späten 20. Jahrhunderts zu arbeiten, die sie auf einen Platz außerhalb der Geschichte verweisen und damit erneut zum Objekt machen. Da sich das meiste Material, das sich auf Sara Bartmann bezieht – in der Regel wird sie nach wie vor als „Hottentoten-Venus“ bezeichnet – sie als Illustation für irgend etwas anders benutzt, stellt sich die Frage, auf welche Weise sich Erzählungen vor der Erbschaft diese Repräsentation distanzieren können. Drei jener literarischen Texte, die meines Erachtens erfrischende Alternativen zu den herkömmlichen Formen der Darstellung Sara Bartmann bieten, werden in Kapitel III vorgestellt. Ich weise nach, inwieweit alle drei Texte in Schwarze feministiche Repräsentitions-Politiken involviert sind. Das vierte und lezte Kapitel untersucht die Leerstellen von Erinnerung und die Frage, wie dies emit den Darstellungen de Diaspora durch die Nachkommen von Sklaveren im western Kap verknüpt sind. Diasporische Realitäten werden zunehmend entfaltet, anerkannt und weiterentwickelt. Dies geschieht vor allem unter jenen Nachfahren der Sklaven, die sich als Cape Malay oder Cape Muslim bezeichnen. Wurden sie früher von den Machthabern als coloured klassifiziert und abgewertet, so gruppieren sie sich heute entlang der Geschichte ihrer versklavten Vorfahren, die von Südost-Asien nach Südafrika transportiert wurden. Dieser Teil der Arbeit analysiert die verschiedenen. Situationen, in denen Erinnerung diasporische Äußerungen signalisiert. Wie ich in einem vorherigen Kapitel dieser Arbeit an hand von Nkiru Nzegwu Argumentation ausführe, benötigt Ernnerung mehr Anstrengungen, um Bedeutungen herauszuarbeiten, als wissenschaftliche Geschichtsschreibung. Diese Studie lies verschiedene Texte daraufhin, wie sie im Sinne der Entwicklung von diasporischer Erinnerung wirksam werden. So werden in diesem Kapitel sowhohl visuelle Installationen als auch die vielfältigen Bedeutungen, die durch sie Sichtbarkeit von Cape Malay Food signalisiert weren, analysiert. Ebenso wird hier untersucht, wie in der ersten Erzählung, die die Sklaverei zum Thema machte und von einem Nachkommen ehemaliger Sklaven geschrieben wurde, kollektieve Zugehörigkeit durch die Anerkennung des Islam als hchkulturelle Religion etabliert wird und dabei die Vergangenheit der Sklaverei als sinnstiftendes Moment in heutingen Identitäts-Prozessen wirkt. Das darin aufscheinende Muster verweist auch auf die Art und Weise, inwieweit heutzutage ein komplexer Flirt mit der Diaspora zugleich auch eine Verankerung an anderen Orten und in anderen identitären Räumen zulässt. Die hier interpretietern Cape Malay bzw. muslimisch-diasporischen künstlerischen Ausdrucksformen am Kap zeigen, wie wenig adäquat die Standards der Diaspora-Theorien bis heute sind. Im Ausblick werden die Ergebnisse der verschiedenen Kapitel zusammengefasst und in einen größeren Zusammenhang gestellt. Ein Großteil des untersuchten Materials zeichnet sich durch eine hohen Grad an Intertextualität as und entzieht sich somit jeglicher „geradlinigen” und „vereinfachenden“ Lesart, sprich ein close reading ist nich mehr möglich. Dies gilt insbesondere für die Leerstellen der Erinnerung – zumal da Erinnerung selbst schon ein in sich selbst hoch komplexes Projekt darstellt. Wie eine Helix last sich hier eine Vorwärtsbewegung und zugleich ein auf sich selbst Zurückblicken ausmachen. In der Zusammenfassung wird der Zeitpunkt des Erscheinens dieser Studie mit dem Fortschreiten des Demokratisierungs-Prozesses kontextualisiert und ein Ausblick für weitere Forschungprojekte eröffnet. So wird deutlich, wie diese Forschung zu allgemeineren Untersuchungen von Erinnerungsprozessen beitragen kann, da gerade das zeitliche Zusammentreffen meine Arbeit mit der zunehmenden Weiterentwicklung der Demokratie im gegenwärtigen Südafrika mit Sicherheit auf die weitere Erforschung von Erinnerungsprozessen Eintfluss haben wird. Zu gutter Letzt verweise ich auf die Leerstellen meiner Arbeit, welche vor allem der Tatsache geschuldet sind, dass dieses die erste ausfrührliche Untersuchung spezifischer Erinnerungsprozesse an die Sklaverei ist: Erinnerungsprozesse, die gegenwärtig in Südafrika zu beobachten sind. Ich eröffne einen Einblick in diese jüngste Entwicklung und einen Ausblick auf mögliche zukünftige Forschungen im Feld der Erinnerung der Sklaverei.
slavery, South Africa, slave memory, postcolonial literature, feminism, coloured, Sarah Baartmann, Hottentot Venus, Khoi, Wicomb, Ferrus
Gqola, Pumla Dineo
2004
English
Universitätsbibliothek der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Gqola, Pumla Dineo (2004): Shackled memories and elusive discourses?: colonial slavery and the contemporary cultural and artistic imagination in South Africa. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty for Languages and Literatures
[img]
Preview
PDF
Gqola_Pumla_Dineo.pdf

2MB

Abstract

Much has been made about South Africa’s transition from histories of colonialism, slavery and most recently apartheid. “Memory” as a descriptive features quite prominently in the definition of the country’s reckoning with its pasts. While there has been an outpouring of academic essays, anthologies and other full length texts which study this transition, most have focused on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). This study links with that research in its concern with South Africa’s past and the meaning-making processes attendant to it, but reads specifically memory activity which pertains to colonial slavery as practiced predominantly in the western Cape for three centuries by the British and the Dutch. Theoretically, the thesis engages closely with the vast terrain of interdisciplinary memory studies which characterises the Humanities and Social Sciences. It reads memory as one way of processing the past, and interprets a variety of cultural, literary and filmic texts to ascertain the particular experiences in relation to slave pasts being fashioned, processed and disseminated. The project studies various negotiations of raced and gendered identities in creative and other and other public spaces in contemporary South Africa, by being particularly attentive to the encoding of consciousness about the country’s slave past. Most usefully, many theorists of memory, Toni Morrison and Dorothy Pennington among them, suggest that this consciousness of the past, and the activity it engenders, is best thought of in shapeshifting forms. Morrison’s rememory, and Pennington’s helix-shaped memory are useful for the reading of creative performances of slave memory thematically and temporally. The introduction opens the inquiry by surveying various strands and themes of the collective memory and history debates of previous decades. In this regard, this beginning is concerned less with pinpointing the exact differences between memory and history, an arguably impossible task given the contestation around the definition, than with ascertaining the locations of specific forms of historical consciousness in the creative imaginary. Much of the material surveyed across disciplines attributes to memory, and popular historymaking, a dialogue between past and present whilst ascribing sense to both the eras and their relationship. In this sense, then, memory is active, entailing a personal relationship with the past which acts as a mediator of reality on a day to day basis. Chapter one analyses the larger memory process in South Africa over the last nine years since the onset of democracy. In the nation-building exercise the relationship between the sites of historical consciousness from different eras finds expression in dissonant localities. Why is it, for example, that so little is known publicly about enslavement as one of the formative systems of a modern South Africa? At the same time, the larger processes of memory-making, mostly linked to the TRC, have engendered a variety of explorations into the possible meanings and experiences of past eras. It also left other experiences as unspeakable. This chapter unpacks the manner in which the narration of apartheid atrocities enabled the excavation of slave presences, together with a questioning of why this unearthing of slave rememory has been so belated. Chapter two reads some of the ways in which a slave past enters into current discourses through which racial identities are being reformatted and renegotiated. It examines the manifestations of this opening up of identity which Kopano Ratele has suggested carries the possibilities of freedom. The chapter reads three processes through which racial belonging is refashioned. First, it analyses the various strands of the project which can be seen to deconstruct the legacy of white racial purity claims until recently. I argue that although superficially the location of indigenous Khoi and slave ancestry within the lineages of apartheid’s ruling families to work similarly to the now widespread white South African laying claim to an indigenous foremother, these nonetheless carry different implications. The differences are uncovered through paying attention to how context alters the ensuing meanings and ends to which they work. It then proceeds from this to examine some of the activity within the terrain of coloured identities. Under previous governments, coloured subjects were legally trapped in discourses of racial mixing. In the western Cape, the communities are descendents of enslaved peoples. The chapter demonstrates how two impulses, one to re-inhabit colouredness as an identity that is historicised and worked through; and another which disclaims it in favour of a Khoi indigeneity with admitted slave foreparentage, work to very similar ends. To the extent that coloured identities and Khoi assertions are inhabited in a variety of ways which jarring political effects, the chapter focuses on two specific collective articulations of these identities. Chapter three analyses representations of Sara Bartmann, the most famous slave and Khoi woman from South Africa. The section addresses itself to representations of this particular subject based on the proliferation of academic, literary and filmic material globally which seeks to represent her. Immortalised under the slur “Hottentot Venus” she has been made to function as icon for a variety of ends since enslavement, transportation to Europe and exhibition in London and Paris, her dissection, and the preservation of her brain and genitalia by France’s foremost anatomist of the nineteenth century in the name of science. The chapter is concerned with the fraught politics of representing her in ways which do not recreate earlier nineteenth century, and more recent misguided twentieth century, tropes which objectify her b y placing her outside history. Given that most of the material which references her name, usually as “Hottentot Venus” uses her as illustration for someone else, how do narratives which dissociate themselves from this legacy represent her? In this chapter three literary texts are read as charting a variety of representations of Bartmann which suggest refreshing alternatives. I argue here that they partake in Black feminist representation politics. The fourth and final chapter examines the crevices of memory, and how it links with representations of diaspora for the descendants of slaves in the western Cape. Diasporic sensibility finds exploration as theme among those descendants of the enshackled who identify as “Cape Malay” or “Cape Muslim”. Also classified coloured in the previous dispensations, these identities cluster around slave foreparentage transported from South East Asia. This section of the thesis analyses various environments where memory signals a diasporic articulation. Given that memory is seen to “linger in forms which do not easily give up the story”, as Nkiru Nzegwu asserts in the introduction, various texts are read to work the service of processing diasporic memory. In this chapter, visual installations, the visibility and negotiations signalled through “Cape Malay food”, and the sense of belonging signalled through Islam as “high cultured” religion in the first novel on slavery written by a descendant of slaves in South Africa, are read for ways in which they link to a making sense of slave pasts for these communities. The emerging pattern also points to the manner in which a sophisticated flirtation with diaspora is able to, at the same time, anchor in another locality. The Cape Malay/Capetonian Muslim diasporic artistic activity read here complicates some of the standard, taken-for-granted, tenets of diaspora theory, and most of its meanings are only uncovered when an assortment of diasporic theoretical tools are brought to bear on the texts. In the conclusion, the findings of the various chapters are brought together with a view to examining the emerging, larger picture. The primary material examined betrays a high level of intertextuality, and resists casting itself in modes which suggest “purist” readings. This appears particularly apt for interpreting the crevices of memory, a project which itself is always complex, and in helix-fashion moving forwards at the same time that it looks in on itself. The ending makes the contribution of this study to studies on the memory process explicit, and finds its timing opportune as the democracy matures and possibly embarks on another stream of projects. This accident of timing will clearly have implications for the study of memory processes in contemporary South Africa. Finally, it suggests some “absences” in this project, the first full-length examination of the terrain of slave re-memory in contemporary South Africa, and concludes by suggesting evolving configurations, as slave memory becomes more public, for future scholastic investigations.

Abstract

Es ist schon viel über den Wandel von Kolonalismus und Sklaverei in Südafrika bis zum Ende der Apartheid geforscht und publiziert worden. In diesen Auseinandersetzungen mit Geschichte und Vergagenheid Südafrikas fungiert der Begriff der „Erinnerung“ als zentrales Konzept. Zwar gibt es inzwischen zahlreiche Essays, Anthologien und wissenschaftliche Texte, die den geschichlichen Wandel untersuchen, doch konzentrierten sich diese zumeist au die Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). Meine Forschungsarbeit steht im Kontext diverser Untersuchungen über Südafrikas Vergagenheit und deren jeweiliger Erklärungsansätze. Zugleich aber interpetiert sie spezifische Formen der kollektiven Erinnerung, die vor allem die durch Briten und Holländer praktizierte Sklaverei in westlichen Kap zum Thema haben. Theoretisch ist diese Arbeit im weiten Feld der interdisziplinären memory studies verortet, die vor allem die angelsächsischen Geisteswissenschaften und Sozialwissenschaften heute prägen. Diese Studie betrachtet Erinnerung als eine Art und Weise der Auseinandersetzung mit der Vergangenheit. Dabei interpretiert sie vielfältige kulturelle, literarische und filmische Texte, die die besondere Erfahrungen der Sklaverei bearbeiten und untersucht, auf welche Weise diese Texte eine Geschichte der Sklaverei entwickeln, bearbeiten und verbreiten. Dieses Projekt untersucht verschiedene Positionen von „rassisch“ und geschlechtich markieterten Identitäten sowohl in kreativen als auch anderen öffentlichen Räumen des gegenwärtigen Südafrika. Besondere Aufmerksamkeit wird hierbei der fortflaufenden Entfaltung sowie Weiterentwicklung des Wissens über die Geschichte der Sklaverei dieses Landes gewidmet. Hilfreicherweise haben viele TheoretikerInnen des Konzepts „Erinnerung“, so auch Toni Morrison und Dorothy Pennington, vorgeschlangen, dass das Bewusstwerden der und das Bewusstein von der Vergangenheit ebenso wie die daraus resultierenden Hadlungsoptionen am besten als flexible Prozesse verstanden warden können. Morrison Konzept der Wieder-Erinnerung und Penningtons Vorstellung von Erinnerung in Form einer Helix ist gerade für das Lesen kreativer Darstellungen, die sich der Sklaverei erinnern, sehr hilfreich. Die Einleitung meiner Arbeit gibt einen ersten Einblick in verschiendene. Strömungen und Themenbereiche all jener Untersuchungen, die sich mit kollektiver Erinnerung un den historischen Debatten der vergangenen Dekaden befassen. Angesichts der zahlreichten Auseinandersetzungen um genaue Definitionen ist die Einleitung weniger al seine Darstellung der konzeptuellen Unterschiede zwischen Erinnerung und Geschichte zu verstehen, sondern untersucht vilemehr die Verortung der spezifischen Formen von historischem Wissen im Rahmen von kreativen Imagination. Das meiste Material, das in dieser Studie die Disziplinen übergreifend untersucht wird, steht in Bezug zu Erinnerungspolitiken, populärer Geschichtsschreibung und einem Dialog zwischen Vergangenheit und Gegenwart. Sowohl der Verbindung von Gegenwart und Vergagenheit, als auch jedem Bereich für sich genommen, ist Bedeutung eingeschrieben. In diesem Sinne stellt Erinnerung eine subjektieve Verbindung mit der Vergangenheit her und stiftet als soche aktiv Bedeutungen im Alltag. Kapitel I analysiert weitreichende Erinnerungsprozesse in Südafrika der lezten 9 Jahre seit Beginn der Demokratie. Gegenwärtige nation building Prozesse spiegeln das oft sehr unterschiedliche Erleben von Vergangenheit wider; Vergangenheiten, die auf sehr verschiedene und oft unvereinbare Weise in das nation building einfließen. Es stellt sich die Frage, warum in der Öffentlichkeit so wenig über die Sklaverei und ihre grundlegende Bedeutung für das moderne Südafrika bekannt ist. Im Zusammenhang mit umfassenderen Prozessen der Erinnerungsarbeit, welche meist mit der Arbeit der Truth and Reconciliation Commission einhergehen, treten unterschiedliche Bedeutungsmöglichkeiten und Erfahrungen der Vergangenheit zu Tage. Dieses Kapitel entfaltet die Art und Weise, in der die Erzählung von den Grausamkeiten der Apartheid leztlich auch die „Ausgrabung“ der Sklaverei ermöglichte. Darüber hinaus widmet sich dieses Kapitel auch der Frage, warum das Aufdecken der Erinnerung as die Sklaverei so lange dauerte. Kapitel II interpretiert discursive Praktiken in denen die Vergangenheit der Sklaverei Identitäten entlang des Konstrukts „Rasse“ entwickelt, reformiert und verhandelt. Es untersucht, dem Vorschlag Kopano Ratele folgend, in wieweit der Prozess einer Öffnung von Identität die Möglichkeit von Freiheit in sich trägt. In diesem Sinne analysiert das Kapitel drei Arten und Weisen, in denen kollektive Zugehörigkeit rund um das Konstrukt „Rasse“ völlig neu entwickelt wird. Zuerst werden die verschiedenen dieser Prozesse entwickelt, die als Dekonstruktion des bis heute wirksammen Erbes weißer „rassischer“ Reinheit betrachtet werden können. Im Kontext dieser Dekonstruction von „Weißheit“ lassen sich zwei oberflächlich ähnliche, aber in ihrer politischen Situiertheit letzlich sehr verschiedene Entwicklungen ausmachen. Dem zunehmend dominanten Diskurs weißer SüdafrikanerInnen, die sich mehr und mehr auf ihre Khoi- und Sklaven-Vorfahren beziehen, wird die Forschung von Ramola Naidoo gegenübergestellt. Auch sie weist nach, dass die moisten der führenden Familien des Apartheidsystems versklavte Vormütter haben, doch die Differenzen zwischen beiden Ansätzen werden deutlich, sobald man berücksichtig, wie der jeweilige Kontext bedeutungs-verändernd wirkt und damit letzlich verschiedene politische Implikationen hat. Darauf folgen werden einege der Aktivitäten innerhalb von coloured identities-Praktiken untersucht. Unter den alten Regierungen waren so genannte Farbige jene Menschen, welche aufgrund der juristischen Definition im Diskurs des „rassischen Mischens“ gefangen waren. Im western Kap stamen solchermaßen begründete. Gemeinschaften von ehermaligen Sklaven ab. Das Kapitel II zeigt, wie zwei identitäre Bewegungen letztlich auf das Gleiche hinauslaufen, nämlich die Ablehnung der Zuschreibung des „Farbig-Seins“ als minderwertige Konsequenz von „rassischer Vermischung“. Die eine Seite be- und erlebt colouredness als historische, sich verändernde und noch immer zu bearbeitende Identität, die andere Seite erkennt die Versklavung der Vorfehren an und weist die Indentität coloured zugunsten einer positive Bezugnahme auf die eigenen Khoi-Ursprünge zurück. Coloured identities und Khoi-Abstammung werden auf so unterschiedliche und oft so unstimmige Weise gelebt, dass sich dieses Kapitel lediglich auf diese zwei soeben dargestellen Formen kollektiver Identitäten konsentriet. Kapitel III untersucht Darstellungsformen von Sara Bartmann, der wohl berühmtesten Sklavin und Khoifrau as Südafrika. Dieser Teil der Arbeit bezieht sich auf jenes akademiesche, literatische und filmische Material, das im Zuge eines weltweit zunehmenden Interesses an Sara Bartmann, versucht sie zu repräsentieren. Seit ihrer Versklavung, ihrer Überführung nach Europa und ihrer Ausstellung in London und Paris, seit ihrer Autopsie und der Konservierung ihres Gehirns und ihrer Genitalien im Namen der Wissenschaft durch Frankreichs berühmtesten Anatomen des 19 Jahrhunderts, wurde Sara Bartmann unter dem Begriff „Hottentoten-Venus“ zur unsterblichen Ikone und dient bis heute verschiedenen Zwecken und Interessen. Die besondere Aufmerksamkeit liegt in diesem Kapitel darauf, Sara Bartmann weder auf jene Art und Weise zu repräsentieren, wie dies im frühen 19. Jahrhundert geschah, noch mit jenen Tropen des späten 20. Jahrhunderts zu arbeiten, die sie auf einen Platz außerhalb der Geschichte verweisen und damit erneut zum Objekt machen. Da sich das meiste Material, das sich auf Sara Bartmann bezieht – in der Regel wird sie nach wie vor als „Hottentoten-Venus“ bezeichnet – sie als Illustation für irgend etwas anders benutzt, stellt sich die Frage, auf welche Weise sich Erzählungen vor der Erbschaft diese Repräsentation distanzieren können. Drei jener literarischen Texte, die meines Erachtens erfrischende Alternativen zu den herkömmlichen Formen der Darstellung Sara Bartmann bieten, werden in Kapitel III vorgestellt. Ich weise nach, inwieweit alle drei Texte in Schwarze feministiche Repräsentitions-Politiken involviert sind. Das vierte und lezte Kapitel untersucht die Leerstellen von Erinnerung und die Frage, wie dies emit den Darstellungen de Diaspora durch die Nachkommen von Sklaveren im western Kap verknüpt sind. Diasporische Realitäten werden zunehmend entfaltet, anerkannt und weiterentwickelt. Dies geschieht vor allem unter jenen Nachfahren der Sklaven, die sich als Cape Malay oder Cape Muslim bezeichnen. Wurden sie früher von den Machthabern als coloured klassifiziert und abgewertet, so gruppieren sie sich heute entlang der Geschichte ihrer versklavten Vorfahren, die von Südost-Asien nach Südafrika transportiert wurden. Dieser Teil der Arbeit analysiert die verschiedenen. Situationen, in denen Erinnerung diasporische Äußerungen signalisiert. Wie ich in einem vorherigen Kapitel dieser Arbeit an hand von Nkiru Nzegwu Argumentation ausführe, benötigt Ernnerung mehr Anstrengungen, um Bedeutungen herauszuarbeiten, als wissenschaftliche Geschichtsschreibung. Diese Studie lies verschiedene Texte daraufhin, wie sie im Sinne der Entwicklung von diasporischer Erinnerung wirksam werden. So werden in diesem Kapitel sowhohl visuelle Installationen als auch die vielfältigen Bedeutungen, die durch sie Sichtbarkeit von Cape Malay Food signalisiert weren, analysiert. Ebenso wird hier untersucht, wie in der ersten Erzählung, die die Sklaverei zum Thema machte und von einem Nachkommen ehemaliger Sklaven geschrieben wurde, kollektieve Zugehörigkeit durch die Anerkennung des Islam als hchkulturelle Religion etabliert wird und dabei die Vergangenheit der Sklaverei als sinnstiftendes Moment in heutingen Identitäts-Prozessen wirkt. Das darin aufscheinende Muster verweist auch auf die Art und Weise, inwieweit heutzutage ein komplexer Flirt mit der Diaspora zugleich auch eine Verankerung an anderen Orten und in anderen identitären Räumen zulässt. Die hier interpretietern Cape Malay bzw. muslimisch-diasporischen künstlerischen Ausdrucksformen am Kap zeigen, wie wenig adäquat die Standards der Diaspora-Theorien bis heute sind. Im Ausblick werden die Ergebnisse der verschiedenen Kapitel zusammengefasst und in einen größeren Zusammenhang gestellt. Ein Großteil des untersuchten Materials zeichnet sich durch eine hohen Grad an Intertextualität as und entzieht sich somit jeglicher „geradlinigen” und „vereinfachenden“ Lesart, sprich ein close reading ist nich mehr möglich. Dies gilt insbesondere für die Leerstellen der Erinnerung – zumal da Erinnerung selbst schon ein in sich selbst hoch komplexes Projekt darstellt. Wie eine Helix last sich hier eine Vorwärtsbewegung und zugleich ein auf sich selbst Zurückblicken ausmachen. In der Zusammenfassung wird der Zeitpunkt des Erscheinens dieser Studie mit dem Fortschreiten des Demokratisierungs-Prozesses kontextualisiert und ein Ausblick für weitere Forschungprojekte eröffnet. So wird deutlich, wie diese Forschung zu allgemeineren Untersuchungen von Erinnerungsprozessen beitragen kann, da gerade das zeitliche Zusammentreffen meine Arbeit mit der zunehmenden Weiterentwicklung der Demokratie im gegenwärtigen Südafrika mit Sicherheit auf die weitere Erforschung von Erinnerungsprozessen Eintfluss haben wird. Zu gutter Letzt verweise ich auf die Leerstellen meiner Arbeit, welche vor allem der Tatsache geschuldet sind, dass dieses die erste ausfrührliche Untersuchung spezifischer Erinnerungsprozesse an die Sklaverei ist: Erinnerungsprozesse, die gegenwärtig in Südafrika zu beobachten sind. Ich eröffne einen Einblick in diese jüngste Entwicklung und einen Ausblick auf mögliche zukünftige Forschungen im Feld der Erinnerung der Sklaverei.