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Characterisation of cold atmospheric plasma afterglow for decontamination
Characterisation of cold atmospheric plasma afterglow for decontamination
The exploration missions of outer space and the associated search for extra-terrestrial lifeforms require to fulfil the international planetary protection policies of COSPAR. Today, dry heat microbial reduction (DHMR) and vapor phase bioburden reduction using hydrogen peroxide (VHP) are validated sterilisation methods for space missions. However, the fact that these methods could negatively influence sensitive materials increases the demand of alternative decontamination methods for space research. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) provides one of the most promising low-temperature decontamination methods and comprises various benefits such as low cost, simple design and comfortable usage. In the presented work, a newly developed plasma afterglow circulation apparatus (PACA) based on the surface micro-discharge (SMD) technology is investigated. To understand the important chemical reaction processes and to evaluate the presented PACA as a useful alternative decontamination method for planetary protection, this thesis combines interdisciplinary research fields of physics, biology and chemistry. In particular, the chemical reaction processes, the microbial inactivation and the material compatibility of the plasma treatment are investigated.
cold atmospheric plasma, sterilisation, endospores, planetary protection
Müller, Meike
2019
English
Universitätsbibliothek der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Müller, Meike (2019): Characterisation of cold atmospheric plasma afterglow for decontamination. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty of Physics
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Abstract

The exploration missions of outer space and the associated search for extra-terrestrial lifeforms require to fulfil the international planetary protection policies of COSPAR. Today, dry heat microbial reduction (DHMR) and vapor phase bioburden reduction using hydrogen peroxide (VHP) are validated sterilisation methods for space missions. However, the fact that these methods could negatively influence sensitive materials increases the demand of alternative decontamination methods for space research. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) provides one of the most promising low-temperature decontamination methods and comprises various benefits such as low cost, simple design and comfortable usage. In the presented work, a newly developed plasma afterglow circulation apparatus (PACA) based on the surface micro-discharge (SMD) technology is investigated. To understand the important chemical reaction processes and to evaluate the presented PACA as a useful alternative decontamination method for planetary protection, this thesis combines interdisciplinary research fields of physics, biology and chemistry. In particular, the chemical reaction processes, the microbial inactivation and the material compatibility of the plasma treatment are investigated.