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Analysis and network simulations of honeybee interneurons responsive to waggle dance vibration signals
Analysis and network simulations of honeybee interneurons responsive to waggle dance vibration signals
BACKGROUND: Honeybees have long fascinated neuroscientists with their highly evolved social structure and rich behavioral repertoire. They sense air vibrations with their antennae, which is vital for several activities during foraging, like waggle dance communication and flight. GOALS: This thesis presents the investigation of the function of an identified vibration-sensitive interneuron, DL-Int-1. Primary goals were the investigation of (i) adaptations during maturation and (ii) the role of DL-Int-1 in networks encoding distance information of waggle dance vibration signals. RESULTS: Visual inspection indicated that DL-Int-1 morphologies had similar gross structure, but were translated, rotated and scaled relative to each other. To enable detailed spatial comparison, an algorithm for the spatial co-registration of neuron morphologies, Reg-MaxS-N was developed and validated. Experimental data from DL-Int-1 was provided by our Japanese collaborators. Comparison of morphologies from newly emerged adult and forager DL-Int-1 revealed minor changes in gross dendritic features and consistent, region-dependent and spatially localized changes in dendritic density. Comparison of electrophysiological response properties showed an increase in firing rate differences between stimulus and non-stimulus periods during maturation. A putative disinhibitory network in the honeybee primary auditory center was proposed based on experimental evidence. Simulations showed that the network was consistent with experimental observations and clarified the central inhibitory role of DL-Int-1 in shaping the network output. RELEVANCE: Reg-MaxS-N presents a novel approach for the spatial co-registration of morphologies. Adaptations in DL-Int-1 morphology during maturation indicate improved connectivity and signal propagation. The central role of DL-Int-1 in a disinhibitory network in the honeybee primary auditory center combined with adaptions in its response properties during maturation could indicate better encoding of distance information from waggle dance vibration sig- nals.
Neuroscience, Electrophysiology, Morphology, Simulations, honeybee, Apis mellifera, waggle dance, Primary mechanosensory center, Dorsal lobe interneurons, putative network, maturation, adaptations, spatial registration, Reg-MaxS-N, Brian2,
Kumaraswamy, Ajayrama
2019
English
Universitätsbibliothek der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Kumaraswamy, Ajayrama (2019): Analysis and network simulations of honeybee interneurons responsive to waggle dance vibration signals. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty of Biology
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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Honeybees have long fascinated neuroscientists with their highly evolved social structure and rich behavioral repertoire. They sense air vibrations with their antennae, which is vital for several activities during foraging, like waggle dance communication and flight. GOALS: This thesis presents the investigation of the function of an identified vibration-sensitive interneuron, DL-Int-1. Primary goals were the investigation of (i) adaptations during maturation and (ii) the role of DL-Int-1 in networks encoding distance information of waggle dance vibration signals. RESULTS: Visual inspection indicated that DL-Int-1 morphologies had similar gross structure, but were translated, rotated and scaled relative to each other. To enable detailed spatial comparison, an algorithm for the spatial co-registration of neuron morphologies, Reg-MaxS-N was developed and validated. Experimental data from DL-Int-1 was provided by our Japanese collaborators. Comparison of morphologies from newly emerged adult and forager DL-Int-1 revealed minor changes in gross dendritic features and consistent, region-dependent and spatially localized changes in dendritic density. Comparison of electrophysiological response properties showed an increase in firing rate differences between stimulus and non-stimulus periods during maturation. A putative disinhibitory network in the honeybee primary auditory center was proposed based on experimental evidence. Simulations showed that the network was consistent with experimental observations and clarified the central inhibitory role of DL-Int-1 in shaping the network output. RELEVANCE: Reg-MaxS-N presents a novel approach for the spatial co-registration of morphologies. Adaptations in DL-Int-1 morphology during maturation indicate improved connectivity and signal propagation. The central role of DL-Int-1 in a disinhibitory network in the honeybee primary auditory center combined with adaptions in its response properties during maturation could indicate better encoding of distance information from waggle dance vibration sig- nals.