Logo Logo
Help
Contact
Switch language to German
Untersuchungen zur Entstehung von RNA und ihrer Modifikationen
Untersuchungen zur Entstehung von RNA und ihrer Modifikationen
The RNA world hypothesis postulates that life began with self-replicating RNA molecules and that both DNA and proteins developed later. RNA can store genetic information and to carry out catalytic processes, which fundamentally strengthens this hypothesis. However, the hypothesis requires the development of RNA building blocks of which the synthesis is compatible with geochemical models of the early Earth. It has been known for a long time that RNA consists of four canonical nucleosides (A, C, G and U) and more than 120 RNA modifications. The question arises whether life only began with the canonical nucleosides or whether modified nucleosides are fossils of this early phase of chemical evolution. The non-canonical bases, in particular amino acid-modified purines, increase the chemical diversity of RNA and thus the folding possibilities and catalytic functions can be achieved. Finding evidence for the potential existence of modified nucleosides on the early Earth requires simple chemistry compatible with early Earth geochemical models to produce these non-canonical bases. In the first part of this work, a model was developed that allows the synthesis to RNA nucleosides through continuous synthesis by simple fluctuations of physical parameters such as temperature, pH value and concentration. In this way, both the canonical and many non-canonical purine nucleosides can be produced in parallel by wet-dry cycles. The data show that modified nucleosides may have been formed as competing molecules. In this sense, they could be regarded as molecular fossils. In the course of this PhD thesis, synthesis routes to further methylated and carbamoylated nucleosides were developed by post-modification of the canonical nucleosides. The simple reaction cascade for obtaining the modified nucleosides is based on isocyanate, methylisocyanate, methylamine, ammonia and sodium nitrite. Therefore, it is compatible with the conditions on the early Earth. The unstable molecule isocyanate can be chemically stored in the form of methylurea while being trapped by methylamine. Methylurea can be nitrosylated to N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, releasing isocyanate again under basic conditions. This chemistry can convert canonical pyrimidines and purines into non-canonical nucleosides. The nitrosylation chemistry described above has also been extended to amino acids, enabling biologically important modified nucleosides such as N6-threonylcarbamyl-adeonsine (t6A) to be obtained prebiotically. Since the modification of the amino acids only led to low yields of aminoacetylated nucleosides, adenosine was modified directly by the reaction with methylisocyanate to create a methyl urea bond and converted to amino acids by the same nitrosylation chemistry. Thus, the yield of aminoacetylated adenosine could be considerably increased. In further experiments, the adenosine precursor molecule formamidopyrimidine (FaPy) could also be derivatized with a methyl urea bond and reacted in further steps to methyl urea-derivatized adenosine. The multitude of reaction pathways, all based on the same chemistry, consolidate that these nucleosides were present on the early Earth. So far, only aminoacetylated adenosine compounds are known in biological systems. It is highly unlikely that only adenosine-amino acid conjugates were selectively formed and other canonical nucleosides with exocyclic nitrogen atoms were not converted under the conditions that prevailed on the early Earth. Therefore, the chemistry for carbamoylation of adenosine was also transferred to the nucleoside cytidine. By reacting cytidine with methylisocyanate, methylurea-derivatized cytidine was furnished in proper yields, which reacted with amino acids to N4-acinoacetylated cytidine through the same nitrosylation chemistry. Thus, the results gained in the context of this doctoral thesis provide evidence that canonical and non-canonical ribonucleosides could be formed spontaneously under prebiotic conditions. Interesting pathways were discovered to modify nucleosides by simple chemistry and possibilities were developed to convert nucleoside precursor molecules into non-canonical RNA building blocks. For the reliable product identification of the prebiotic studies, reference molecules were produced and characterized by classical organic synthesis. Almost all phosphorus in the Earth's crust is in the form of orthophosphate, which is unreactive and has poor solubility. Consequently, it is hardly possible to use the phosphate for the phosphorylation of nucleosides to nucleotides under prebiotic conditions. However, this phosphorylation is indispensable for the polymerization to oligonucleotides. In a further part of this work, methods were developed to use frequently occurring minerals such as struvite and vivianite as phosphate sources for phosphorylation. By using oxalic acid, the yield of nucleotides could be significantly increased with struvite. In addition, the poorly soluble iron phosphate vivianite could be partially dissolved with the help of oxalic acid, so that the phosphate was available for phosphorylation of nucleosides to monophosphates. Finally, the acquired results in the present doctoral thesis provide important information on possible phosphate sources on the early Earth. Another aim of this thesis was to test whether it is possible to polymerize activated cyclic 2',3' nucleoside monophosphates by pressure. The oligomerization of nucleotides in aqueous solutions poses a challenge because it is neither kinetically nor thermodynamically preferred. Cyclic nucleoside monophosphates are much more reactive than the corresponding 5' monophosphates, as the binding of the newly formed phosphodiester bond is thermodynamically favoured. The polymerization of the nucleosides into oligomers demand the variation of diverse parameters such as pressure and temperature. Dinucleotides could be obtained by short heating pulses (1-2 min) or prolonged heating (30 min) up to 50°C. The exchange of the sodium counterion and the subsequent pressing of the free nucleoside monophosphate also led to the formation of dimers in the case of adenosine. The yields of the dimers for adenosine are between 2% and 3%. In conclusion, in the course of this work novel methods were developed towards the production of RNA dimers from activated nucleosides by pressure., Die RNA-Welthypothese postuliert, dass das Leben mit selbstreplizierenden RNA-Molekülen begann und sich sowohl DNA als auch Proteine später entwickelten. RNA ist zum einen in der Lage genetische Informationen zu speichern und zum anderen katalytische Prozesse durchzuführen, was diese Hypothese grundlegend stärkt. Die Hypothese erfordert allerdings Entstehungswege der RNA-Bausteine, die mit geochemischen Modellen der frühen Erde kompatibel sind. Es ist schon lange bekannt, dass RNA neben den vier kanonischen Nukleosiden (A, C, G und U) auch aus über 120 RNA-Modifikationen besteht. Es stellt sich die Frage, ob das Leben nur mit den kanonischen Nukleosiden begann oder ob modifizierte Nukleoside Fossilien dieser frühen Phase der chemischen Evolution darstellen. Die nicht-kanonischen Basen, insbesondere die Aminosäure-modifizierten Purine, steigern die chemische Vielfalt von RNA, womit die Faltungsmöglichkeiten und die katalytischen Funktionen ausgeweitet werden können. Um Beweise für die Existenz von modifizierten Nukleosiden auf der frühen Erde zu finden bedarf es einfacher Chemie, die mit geochemischen Modellen der frühen Erde kompatibel ist, um diese nicht-kanonischen Basen zu erzeugen. Im ersten Teil der Arbeit konnte ein Modell entwickelt werden, welches durch die einfache Änderung physikalischer Parameter wie Temperatur, pH-Wert und Konzentration den Zugang zu RNA-Nukleosiden durch eine kontinuierliche Synthese ermöglicht. Dabei können sowohl die kanonischen als auch viele nicht-kanonische Purin-Nukleoside parallel durch Nass-Trocken-Zyklen erzeugt werden (vgl. Abbildung 1A). Die Daten zeigen, dass modifizierte Nukleoside möglicherweise als Konkurrenzmoleküle gebildet wurden. Sie könnten in diesem Sinne als molekulare Fossilien betrachtet werden. Im Zuge dieser Doktorarbeit wurden außerdem Syntheserouten zu weiteren methylierten sowie carbamoylierten Nukleosiden durch eine Postmodifikation der Nukleoside entwickelt. Die einfache Reaktions-Kaskade zur Erlangung der modifizierten Nukleoside beruht auf Reaktionen unter Beteiligung von Isocyanat, Methylisocyanat, Methylamin, Ammoniak und Natriumnitrit und ist somit mit den Bedingungen auf der frühen Erde kompatibel. Das instabile Molekül Isocyanat kann in Form von Methylharnstoff chemisch gespeichert werden, indem es durch Methylamin abgefangen wird. Methylharnstoff kann zu N-Methyl-N-nitrosoharnstoff nitrosyliert werden, wodurch unter basischen Bedingungen wieder Isocyanat freigesetzt wird. Durch diese Chemie können kanonische Pyrimidine und Purine in nicht-kanonische Nukleoside umgewandelt werden. Die beschriebene Nitrosylierungs-Chemie konnte darüber hinaus auf Aminosäuren ausgeweitet werden, wodurch biologisch wichtige modifizierte Nukleoside, wie N6-Threonylcarbamyladeonsin (t6A), auf präbiotischem Wege erhalten werden konnten. Da die Modifizierung der Aminosäuren zu geringen Ausbeuten an aminoacetylierten Nukleosiden führte, wurde Adenosin direkt durch die Reaktion mit Methylisocyanat mit einer Methylharnstoffbindung modifiziert und durch dieselbe Nitrosylierungs-Chemie unter der Bildung von Isocyanaten mit Aminosäuren umgesetzt. Dadurch konnte die Ausbeute an aminoacetyliertem Adenosin erheblich gesteigert werden. In weiteren Experimenten konnte auch das Adenosin-Vorläufermolekül Formamidopyrimidin (FaPy) mit einer Methylharnstoffbindung derivatisiert werden und in zusätzlichen Schritten zu Methylharnstoff-derivatisiertem Adenosin reagieren. Die Vielzahl an Reaktionswegen, die alle auf derselben Chemie beruhen, bekräftigen die Zugänglichkeit zu Aminosäure-modifizierten Nukleosiden auf der frühen Erde. Bisher sind ausschließlich aminoacetylierte Adenosin-Verbindungen in biologischen Systemen bekannt. Es ist allerdings höchst unwahrscheinlich, dass unter den Bedingungen, die auf der frühen Erde herrschten, selektiv nur Adenosin-Aminosäuren-Konjugate entstanden und anderen kanonische Nukleoside mit exocyclischen Stickstoffen nicht umgesetzt wurden. Deshalb wurde die Chemie zur Carbamoylierung von Adenosin auch auf das Nukleosid Cytidin übertragen. Durch die Umsetzung von Cytidin mit Methylisocyanat konnte Methylharnstoff-derivatisiertes Cytidin erhalten werden, welches durch dieselbe Nitrosylierungs-Chemie mit Aminosäuren zu N4-aminoacetyliertem Cytidin reagiert. Damit liefern die im Rahmen dieser Doktorarbeit gewonnen Ergebnisse einen Beweis dafür, dass kanonische und nicht-kanonische Ribonukleoside spontan unter präbiotischen Bedingungen gebildet werden konnten. Dabei wurden zum einen Wege gefunden, um Nukleoside durch einfache Chemie zu modifizieren und zum anderen Möglichkeiten entwickelt, um Nukleosid-Vorläufermoleküle in nicht-kanonische RNA-Bausteine zu überführen. Um die Produkte der präbiotischen Studien sicher zu identifizieren, wurden außerdem Referenzmoleküle durch klassische organische Synthesen hergestellt und charakterisiert. Fast der gesamte Phosphor der Erdkruste liegt in Form von Orthophosphat vor, welches zum einen unreaktiv ist und zum anderen eine schlechte Löslichkeit aufweist. Somit ist es kaum möglich, das Phosphat für die Phosphorylierung von Nukleosiden zu Nukleotiden unter präbiotischen Bedingungen zu verwenden. Diese Phosphorylierung ist für die Polymerisation zu Oligonukleotiden allerdings unumgänglich. In einem weiteren Teil dieser Arbeit wurden daher Methoden entwickelt, um häufig vorkommende Mineralien wie Struvit und Vivianit als Phosphatquellen für die Phosphorylierung einzusetzen. Durch den Einsatz von Oxalsäure konnte die Ausbeute an Nukleotiden durch das Mineral Struvit deutlich erhöht werden. Darüber hinaus konnte das schwerlösliche Eisenphosphat Vivianit mit Hilfe von Oxalsäure teilweile gelöst werden, so dass das Phosphat für Phosphorylierungen von Nukleosiden zu Monophosphaten zur Verfügung stand. Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit sollte getestet werden, ob es möglich ist, aktivierte cyclische 2‘,3‘-Nukleosidmonophosphate durch Druck zu polymerisieren. Die Oligomerisierung von Nukleotiden in wässrigen Lösungen stellt eine Herausforderung dar, da sie weder kinetisch noch thermodynamisch bevorzugt ist. Cyclische Nukleosid-Monophosphate sind sehr viel reaktiver als die entsprechenden 5‘-Monophosphate, da die Knüpfung der neu entstehenden Phosphodiesterbindung thermodynamisch begünstigt ist. Um die Nukleoside zu Oligomeren zu polymerisieren, wurden verschiedene Parameter wie Druck und Temperatur variiert. Durch kurze Heizschübe oder kurzes Erhitzen auf 50°C konnten Dimere erhalten werden. Auch der Austausch des Natrium-Gegenions und das anschließende Pressen des freien Nukleosidmonophosphat führte im Fall von Adenosin zur Bildung von Dimeren. Die Ausbeuten der Dimere lagen zwischen circa 2 % und 3 %.
Not available
Schneider, Christina
2019
German
Universitätsbibliothek der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Schneider, Christina (2019): Untersuchungen zur Entstehung von RNA und ihrer Modifikationen. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty of Chemistry and Pharmacy
[img]
Preview
PDF
Schneider_Christina.pdf

10MB

Abstract

The RNA world hypothesis postulates that life began with self-replicating RNA molecules and that both DNA and proteins developed later. RNA can store genetic information and to carry out catalytic processes, which fundamentally strengthens this hypothesis. However, the hypothesis requires the development of RNA building blocks of which the synthesis is compatible with geochemical models of the early Earth. It has been known for a long time that RNA consists of four canonical nucleosides (A, C, G and U) and more than 120 RNA modifications. The question arises whether life only began with the canonical nucleosides or whether modified nucleosides are fossils of this early phase of chemical evolution. The non-canonical bases, in particular amino acid-modified purines, increase the chemical diversity of RNA and thus the folding possibilities and catalytic functions can be achieved. Finding evidence for the potential existence of modified nucleosides on the early Earth requires simple chemistry compatible with early Earth geochemical models to produce these non-canonical bases. In the first part of this work, a model was developed that allows the synthesis to RNA nucleosides through continuous synthesis by simple fluctuations of physical parameters such as temperature, pH value and concentration. In this way, both the canonical and many non-canonical purine nucleosides can be produced in parallel by wet-dry cycles. The data show that modified nucleosides may have been formed as competing molecules. In this sense, they could be regarded as molecular fossils. In the course of this PhD thesis, synthesis routes to further methylated and carbamoylated nucleosides were developed by post-modification of the canonical nucleosides. The simple reaction cascade for obtaining the modified nucleosides is based on isocyanate, methylisocyanate, methylamine, ammonia and sodium nitrite. Therefore, it is compatible with the conditions on the early Earth. The unstable molecule isocyanate can be chemically stored in the form of methylurea while being trapped by methylamine. Methylurea can be nitrosylated to N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, releasing isocyanate again under basic conditions. This chemistry can convert canonical pyrimidines and purines into non-canonical nucleosides. The nitrosylation chemistry described above has also been extended to amino acids, enabling biologically important modified nucleosides such as N6-threonylcarbamyl-adeonsine (t6A) to be obtained prebiotically. Since the modification of the amino acids only led to low yields of aminoacetylated nucleosides, adenosine was modified directly by the reaction with methylisocyanate to create a methyl urea bond and converted to amino acids by the same nitrosylation chemistry. Thus, the yield of aminoacetylated adenosine could be considerably increased. In further experiments, the adenosine precursor molecule formamidopyrimidine (FaPy) could also be derivatized with a methyl urea bond and reacted in further steps to methyl urea-derivatized adenosine. The multitude of reaction pathways, all based on the same chemistry, consolidate that these nucleosides were present on the early Earth. So far, only aminoacetylated adenosine compounds are known in biological systems. It is highly unlikely that only adenosine-amino acid conjugates were selectively formed and other canonical nucleosides with exocyclic nitrogen atoms were not converted under the conditions that prevailed on the early Earth. Therefore, the chemistry for carbamoylation of adenosine was also transferred to the nucleoside cytidine. By reacting cytidine with methylisocyanate, methylurea-derivatized cytidine was furnished in proper yields, which reacted with amino acids to N4-acinoacetylated cytidine through the same nitrosylation chemistry. Thus, the results gained in the context of this doctoral thesis provide evidence that canonical and non-canonical ribonucleosides could be formed spontaneously under prebiotic conditions. Interesting pathways were discovered to modify nucleosides by simple chemistry and possibilities were developed to convert nucleoside precursor molecules into non-canonical RNA building blocks. For the reliable product identification of the prebiotic studies, reference molecules were produced and characterized by classical organic synthesis. Almost all phosphorus in the Earth's crust is in the form of orthophosphate, which is unreactive and has poor solubility. Consequently, it is hardly possible to use the phosphate for the phosphorylation of nucleosides to nucleotides under prebiotic conditions. However, this phosphorylation is indispensable for the polymerization to oligonucleotides. In a further part of this work, methods were developed to use frequently occurring minerals such as struvite and vivianite as phosphate sources for phosphorylation. By using oxalic acid, the yield of nucleotides could be significantly increased with struvite. In addition, the poorly soluble iron phosphate vivianite could be partially dissolved with the help of oxalic acid, so that the phosphate was available for phosphorylation of nucleosides to monophosphates. Finally, the acquired results in the present doctoral thesis provide important information on possible phosphate sources on the early Earth. Another aim of this thesis was to test whether it is possible to polymerize activated cyclic 2',3' nucleoside monophosphates by pressure. The oligomerization of nucleotides in aqueous solutions poses a challenge because it is neither kinetically nor thermodynamically preferred. Cyclic nucleoside monophosphates are much more reactive than the corresponding 5' monophosphates, as the binding of the newly formed phosphodiester bond is thermodynamically favoured. The polymerization of the nucleosides into oligomers demand the variation of diverse parameters such as pressure and temperature. Dinucleotides could be obtained by short heating pulses (1-2 min) or prolonged heating (30 min) up to 50°C. The exchange of the sodium counterion and the subsequent pressing of the free nucleoside monophosphate also led to the formation of dimers in the case of adenosine. The yields of the dimers for adenosine are between 2% and 3%. In conclusion, in the course of this work novel methods were developed towards the production of RNA dimers from activated nucleosides by pressure.

Abstract

Die RNA-Welthypothese postuliert, dass das Leben mit selbstreplizierenden RNA-Molekülen begann und sich sowohl DNA als auch Proteine später entwickelten. RNA ist zum einen in der Lage genetische Informationen zu speichern und zum anderen katalytische Prozesse durchzuführen, was diese Hypothese grundlegend stärkt. Die Hypothese erfordert allerdings Entstehungswege der RNA-Bausteine, die mit geochemischen Modellen der frühen Erde kompatibel sind. Es ist schon lange bekannt, dass RNA neben den vier kanonischen Nukleosiden (A, C, G und U) auch aus über 120 RNA-Modifikationen besteht. Es stellt sich die Frage, ob das Leben nur mit den kanonischen Nukleosiden begann oder ob modifizierte Nukleoside Fossilien dieser frühen Phase der chemischen Evolution darstellen. Die nicht-kanonischen Basen, insbesondere die Aminosäure-modifizierten Purine, steigern die chemische Vielfalt von RNA, womit die Faltungsmöglichkeiten und die katalytischen Funktionen ausgeweitet werden können. Um Beweise für die Existenz von modifizierten Nukleosiden auf der frühen Erde zu finden bedarf es einfacher Chemie, die mit geochemischen Modellen der frühen Erde kompatibel ist, um diese nicht-kanonischen Basen zu erzeugen. Im ersten Teil der Arbeit konnte ein Modell entwickelt werden, welches durch die einfache Änderung physikalischer Parameter wie Temperatur, pH-Wert und Konzentration den Zugang zu RNA-Nukleosiden durch eine kontinuierliche Synthese ermöglicht. Dabei können sowohl die kanonischen als auch viele nicht-kanonische Purin-Nukleoside parallel durch Nass-Trocken-Zyklen erzeugt werden (vgl. Abbildung 1A). Die Daten zeigen, dass modifizierte Nukleoside möglicherweise als Konkurrenzmoleküle gebildet wurden. Sie könnten in diesem Sinne als molekulare Fossilien betrachtet werden. Im Zuge dieser Doktorarbeit wurden außerdem Syntheserouten zu weiteren methylierten sowie carbamoylierten Nukleosiden durch eine Postmodifikation der Nukleoside entwickelt. Die einfache Reaktions-Kaskade zur Erlangung der modifizierten Nukleoside beruht auf Reaktionen unter Beteiligung von Isocyanat, Methylisocyanat, Methylamin, Ammoniak und Natriumnitrit und ist somit mit den Bedingungen auf der frühen Erde kompatibel. Das instabile Molekül Isocyanat kann in Form von Methylharnstoff chemisch gespeichert werden, indem es durch Methylamin abgefangen wird. Methylharnstoff kann zu N-Methyl-N-nitrosoharnstoff nitrosyliert werden, wodurch unter basischen Bedingungen wieder Isocyanat freigesetzt wird. Durch diese Chemie können kanonische Pyrimidine und Purine in nicht-kanonische Nukleoside umgewandelt werden. Die beschriebene Nitrosylierungs-Chemie konnte darüber hinaus auf Aminosäuren ausgeweitet werden, wodurch biologisch wichtige modifizierte Nukleoside, wie N6-Threonylcarbamyladeonsin (t6A), auf präbiotischem Wege erhalten werden konnten. Da die Modifizierung der Aminosäuren zu geringen Ausbeuten an aminoacetylierten Nukleosiden führte, wurde Adenosin direkt durch die Reaktion mit Methylisocyanat mit einer Methylharnstoffbindung modifiziert und durch dieselbe Nitrosylierungs-Chemie unter der Bildung von Isocyanaten mit Aminosäuren umgesetzt. Dadurch konnte die Ausbeute an aminoacetyliertem Adenosin erheblich gesteigert werden. In weiteren Experimenten konnte auch das Adenosin-Vorläufermolekül Formamidopyrimidin (FaPy) mit einer Methylharnstoffbindung derivatisiert werden und in zusätzlichen Schritten zu Methylharnstoff-derivatisiertem Adenosin reagieren. Die Vielzahl an Reaktionswegen, die alle auf derselben Chemie beruhen, bekräftigen die Zugänglichkeit zu Aminosäure-modifizierten Nukleosiden auf der frühen Erde. Bisher sind ausschließlich aminoacetylierte Adenosin-Verbindungen in biologischen Systemen bekannt. Es ist allerdings höchst unwahrscheinlich, dass unter den Bedingungen, die auf der frühen Erde herrschten, selektiv nur Adenosin-Aminosäuren-Konjugate entstanden und anderen kanonische Nukleoside mit exocyclischen Stickstoffen nicht umgesetzt wurden. Deshalb wurde die Chemie zur Carbamoylierung von Adenosin auch auf das Nukleosid Cytidin übertragen. Durch die Umsetzung von Cytidin mit Methylisocyanat konnte Methylharnstoff-derivatisiertes Cytidin erhalten werden, welches durch dieselbe Nitrosylierungs-Chemie mit Aminosäuren zu N4-aminoacetyliertem Cytidin reagiert. Damit liefern die im Rahmen dieser Doktorarbeit gewonnen Ergebnisse einen Beweis dafür, dass kanonische und nicht-kanonische Ribonukleoside spontan unter präbiotischen Bedingungen gebildet werden konnten. Dabei wurden zum einen Wege gefunden, um Nukleoside durch einfache Chemie zu modifizieren und zum anderen Möglichkeiten entwickelt, um Nukleosid-Vorläufermoleküle in nicht-kanonische RNA-Bausteine zu überführen. Um die Produkte der präbiotischen Studien sicher zu identifizieren, wurden außerdem Referenzmoleküle durch klassische organische Synthesen hergestellt und charakterisiert. Fast der gesamte Phosphor der Erdkruste liegt in Form von Orthophosphat vor, welches zum einen unreaktiv ist und zum anderen eine schlechte Löslichkeit aufweist. Somit ist es kaum möglich, das Phosphat für die Phosphorylierung von Nukleosiden zu Nukleotiden unter präbiotischen Bedingungen zu verwenden. Diese Phosphorylierung ist für die Polymerisation zu Oligonukleotiden allerdings unumgänglich. In einem weiteren Teil dieser Arbeit wurden daher Methoden entwickelt, um häufig vorkommende Mineralien wie Struvit und Vivianit als Phosphatquellen für die Phosphorylierung einzusetzen. Durch den Einsatz von Oxalsäure konnte die Ausbeute an Nukleotiden durch das Mineral Struvit deutlich erhöht werden. Darüber hinaus konnte das schwerlösliche Eisenphosphat Vivianit mit Hilfe von Oxalsäure teilweile gelöst werden, so dass das Phosphat für Phosphorylierungen von Nukleosiden zu Monophosphaten zur Verfügung stand. Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit sollte getestet werden, ob es möglich ist, aktivierte cyclische 2‘,3‘-Nukleosidmonophosphate durch Druck zu polymerisieren. Die Oligomerisierung von Nukleotiden in wässrigen Lösungen stellt eine Herausforderung dar, da sie weder kinetisch noch thermodynamisch bevorzugt ist. Cyclische Nukleosid-Monophosphate sind sehr viel reaktiver als die entsprechenden 5‘-Monophosphate, da die Knüpfung der neu entstehenden Phosphodiesterbindung thermodynamisch begünstigt ist. Um die Nukleoside zu Oligomeren zu polymerisieren, wurden verschiedene Parameter wie Druck und Temperatur variiert. Durch kurze Heizschübe oder kurzes Erhitzen auf 50°C konnten Dimere erhalten werden. Auch der Austausch des Natrium-Gegenions und das anschließende Pressen des freien Nukleosidmonophosphat führte im Fall von Adenosin zur Bildung von Dimeren. Die Ausbeuten der Dimere lagen zwischen circa 2 % und 3 %.