Logo Logo
Help
Contact
Switch language to German
Understanding socio-groundwater systems: framework, toolbox, and stakeholders’ efforts for analysis and monitoring groundwater resources
Understanding socio-groundwater systems: framework, toolbox, and stakeholders’ efforts for analysis and monitoring groundwater resources
Groundwater, the predominant accessible reservoir of freshwater storage on Earth, plays an important role as a human-natural life sustaining resource. In recent decades there has been an increasing concern that human activities are placing too much pressure on the resource, affecting the health of the ecosystem. However, because groundwater it is out of sight, its monitoring on both global and local scales is challenging. In the field of groundwater monitoring, modelling tools have been developed for improving insights into groundwater characteristics, dynamics, and patterns in the hydrological cycle. Although models are accessible, the drawbacks are: they are not always locally affordable, data are not always reliable, and stakeholders are not included. Global assessments are important, but problems might be exacerbated if we do not examine groundwater from another perspective by considering that its related problems are largely local. An example of this is the groundwater system in Yucatan, Mexico, a place where groundwater is the only source of freshwater for the population and where inhabitants have to deal with pollution problems, salt intrusion, biodiversity loss and resource degradation. Consequently the water situation can quickly reach critical conditions and even small disturbances may have dramatic consequences. Goal The goal of this research project is to “develop a research toolbox for understanding and developing a monitoring system for socio-groundwater systems. The toolbox includes a transdisciplinary methodology to develop a Socio-Groundwater model, to investigate factors that influence the way in which groundwater resources are managed, to support monitoring efforts and approaches to contribute to groundwater literacy”. The work described in this thesis deals with the design of the framework, characterization and modelling of the system by (i) developing a model by analyzing the relevant fluxes of the groundwater system, (ii) eliciting the stakeholders mental models, their values regarding groundwater use and management, and (iii) proposing a groundwater toolbox to integrate different methods with environmental activities for a better groundwater resource management. Methods This thesis is part of a larger project organized in three phases: development of the framework, the toolbox and monitoring. Five different, interrelated, methodologies for system analysis have been developed and employed, including: 1 material flow analysis (to quantify groundwater flows associated with present-day economic sectors), 2 mental models (to analyze stakeholders’ risk perception regarding groundwater pollution, by eliciting mental models), 3 underwater exploration (to obtain insights about current status of local wells and sinkholes), 4 community-based conservation (to integrate local values, beliefs and perceptions into groundwater conservation), 5 environmental activism (to directly involve stakeholders in local well clean-ups, and community events). These methods were developed in a transdisciplinary process with stakeholders spanning sectors including: NGOs, local communities and policy makers. Analysis and results We analyzed, in a unique way, groundwater in Yucatan, Mexico, where no other sources of freshwater exist. Applying system analysis and bringing local and scientific knowledge, we adapted our framework and methods to understand sociogroundwater systems. Data was obtained from a range of different sources: literature, national and local statistics, stakeholder’s workshops, expert opinions, expert consultation, local interviews, and estimations. Investigation of flows by applying MFA helped us to develop the first Local Groundwater Balance Model. The results from this revealed: a) high wastewater emissions into the aquifer (ca. 6.4 hm3 year−1). Wastewater ranges from grey water to wastewater with high concentrations of organic matter (i.e., discharges from pig farms) and alkaline discharges (i.e., tortilla industry); b) all wastewater emissions are discharged directly into the aquifer without treatment; c) poor recycling practices (<1%, relative to the total water emissions). Mental models of local members and experts were elucidated and discrepancies were found regarding risk perceptions. The results revealed that experts’ conceptions were rather unclear and incomplete, based on characteristics of the system. They described fluxes erroneously, vaguely, and depicted unclear flows representing the system.Experts perceive a clear connection with pollution and related health risks. Locals described groundwater as clean drinking water, originating from rainfall, but stored in the ocean. They described fluxes erroneously and they were not aware of the concept of groundwater stored in a porous medium. The local population did not see any connection between pollution (i.e., use of pesticides) and health related risks. Overall, the mental models did not overlap since locals did not have a clear understanding of their influence on the system whereas experts did. Interviews revealed a profound sense of loss of local and traditional knowledge, a strong desire to learn about groundwater, to restore cultural practices and to revitalize local values. Contemporary governance status and regimes of the cenotes are mostly mixed or unclear. Community respondents did not seem to associate contamination of cenotes and the governance regime, and what that might imply for stewardship responsibilities. Interviewees did not understand that all cenotes are part of a single interconnected groundwater system, and cultural values did not seem to be considered. Speleological records obtained during underwater explorations evidenced current hotspots of pollution due to bad waste disposal local practices. Cenotes explored indicated bad waste disposal practices in open-illegal dumping. Through sinkhole clean-ups, locals were aware of groundwater sensitivity, hazardous materials associated with human activities (i.e., agriculture) and this provided insights into local pollution sources. We collected ca. 400 kg of plastics and solid waste from just one of the cenotes explored. Plastic bags, cups, cans and cigarette butts were amongst the top ten items collected. Direct involvement with policy makers, experts and locals was found to be key to guide and validate the project stages in an iterative process, and simultaneously narrowed the gap between science, policy-making and society towards groundwater sustainability. Conclusions In the study of the groundwater system in Yucatan, we found that technical solutions to groundwater problems are of importance; however, local stakeholder involvement is crucial. We agree with the relevance of models, but we offer a much more comprehensive view and approach to local groundwater problems since we involved stakeholders during the research process. This is a reliable and versatile methodology that meaningfully contributes to groundwater sustainability and literacy. It can be adapted to the specific social, economic, political, and environmental setting of different regions. A real transformation is required in how we value, manage and characterize groundwater systems since hydrological-only models and singlediscipline approaches seemed to have failed. The proposed toolbox, framework and approaches help to identify the patterns of changes in biosphere leading to changes in inequality, as a driver of resource use patterns. To implement SDG 6, our toolbox specifically supports the following Targets 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, and 6.6 (a & b) by: facilitating examination of hotspots of pollution, distribution of flows of hazardous substances, minimizing release of chemicals, ensuring sustainable withdrawals, revealing water extraction trends and sectors with major consumption, strengthening participation of local communities, and safeguarding the ecosystem by recognizing traditional ecological knowledge as an informal norm of monitoring. Our results support the current global monitoring framework of SDG 6, by acknowledging the importance of community participation and that groundwater literacy is essential to effectively address SDG 6 and its water related targets., Problem Grundwasser ist das wichtigste zugängliche Speicherreservoir für Süßwasser auf der Erde. Es besitzt eine zentrale Bedeutung als lebenserhaltende Ressource für die Menschen und die belebte Natur. In den letzten Jahrzehnten wächst die Sorge über den Druck, den die menschlichen Aktivitäten auf diese Ressource ausüben, wodurch die Funktionsfähigkeit des Ökosystems gefährdet wird. Da allerdings das Grundwasser unsichtbar ist, verändert sich dessen Erfassung sowohl auf globaler wie auch lokaler Ebene. Im Bereich des Grundwassermonitorings wurden Werkzeuge der Modellierung entwickelt, welche die Einblicke in die Eigenschaften, die Dynamik und in den Wasserkreislauf des Grundwassers erhöhten. Obwohl diese Modelle zugänglich sind, sind auch Nachteile und Schwierigkeiten zu konstatieren: Sie sind nicht immer vor Ort bezahlbar; Daten sind nicht immer zuverlässig; und einige Interessengruppen sind nicht beteiligt. Globale Beurteilungen sind zwar wichtig, aber die Probleme können sich noch verschärft, wenn das Grundwasser nicht auch aus einer Perspektive betrachtet wird, welche den konkreten lokalen Bezug der Probleme berücksichtigt. Um zu einer Überwindung dieser Probleme beizutragen wird in der vorliegenden Arbeit am Beispiel der Grundwassernutzung in Yukatan das komplexe Zusammenwirken von sozialen und natürlichen Systemen in einem Raum mit geophysikalisch wie auch kulturell einzigartigen Bedingungen untersucht. Ziel Das Ziel des Forschungsvorhabens ist es, einen Forschungs-Werkzeugkasten für das Verständnis und die Entwicklung eines Monitoringsystems für Sozio-Grundwasser- Systeme zu erarbeiten. Die Toolbox beinhaltet eine transdisziplinäre Methodik zur Entwicklung eines Sozio-Grundwasser-Modells, eine Untersuchung der Faktoren, welche die Art und Weise beeinflussen, in der Grundwasserressourcen verwaltet werden, die Unterstützung von Bestrebungen des Monitorings sowie Ansätze, welche zu Grundwasserkenntnissen beitragen. Die vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit der Entwicklung eines Rahmens zur Charakterisierung und der Modellierung des Systems, indem (i) ein Modell entwickelt wird, das die relevanten Flüsse des Grundwassersystems analysiert, (ii) die mentalen Deutungsmuster und die Werte der Interessensgruppen bezüglich der Grundwassernutzung- und Regulierung herausarbeitet und (iii) ein ‘Werkzeugkasten’ vorgeschlagen wird, der verschiedene Methoden der Umweltnutzung integriert und so zu einem besseres Management der Grundwasserressourcen beiträgt. Methodischer Ansatz Wir verwenden fünf verschiedene, miteinander verbundene Methodologien: 1) Materialflussanalyse: um Grundwasserströme im Zusammenhang mit den gegenwärtigen Wirtschaftssektoren zu analysieren; 2) Den Ansatz der strukturellen mentalen Muster, um die unterschiedliche Risikowahrnehmung der Interessensgruppen bezüglich der Verschmutzung des Grundwassers infolge der mentalen Modelle herauszuarbeiten; 3) Unterwassererkundung, um Einblicke bezüglich des aktuellen und tatsächlichen Status der örtlichen Brunnen und Dolinen zu erhalten; 4) Gemeinschaftsorientierte Ansätze, um lokale Werte, Überzeugungen und Wahrnehmungen in Maßnahmen zum Grundwasserschutz zu integrieren; 5) Umweltaktivismus, um beteiligen Akteure direkt in die lokalen Sanierungsmaßnahmen und Community-Events einzubinden. Diese Methoden werden in einem transdisziplinären Prozess mit den Beteiligten (NGOs, kommunale Gemeinden und politische Entscheidungsträger) entwickelt. Analyse und Ergebnisse Untersucht wird das Grundwasser auf der Halbinsel Yukatan in Mexiko, einem einzigartigen Gebiet, wo keine anderen Süßwasserressourcen vorhanden sind. Methoden der Systemanalyse und lokale und wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnisse über dieses Gebiet werden in einer integrierten Perspektive zusammengeführt. Die Daten stammen aus verschiedenen Quellen: Literatur, nationale und lokalen Statistiken, Stakeholder-Workshops, Gutachten, Expertenberatung, lokale Interviews und Schätzungen. Untersuchung über Strömungen durch die Anwendung einer Grundwasserflussanalyse ermöglichten es, ein erstes Modell der Wasser-Balance zu entwickeln und die Schmutzwasseremissionen in die Grundwasserspeicher zu erheben. Die Ergebnisse zeigen: a) hohe Abwasseremissionen im Grundwasser (ca. 6.4 hm3/Jahr). Die Abwässer reichen von Brauchwasser bis hin zu Abwässern mit hohen Konzentrationen an organischen Stoffen (z.B. Einleitungen aus der Schweinehaltung) und alkalische Einträge (d.h. Tortilla-Industrie); b) alle Abwasseremissionen fließen direkt ohne Behandlung in das Grundwasser; c) geringe Recyclingmengen (<1 %, bezogen auf die gesamten Wasseremissionen). Die mentalen Modelle der lokalen Akteure und Experten wurden erfasst und Diskrepanzen in Bezug auf die Risikowahrnehmung gefunden. Die Ergebnisse machen deutlich: Die Vorstellungen der Experten waren ziemlich unklar und unvollständig bezüglich der Eigenschaften des Systems? Sie beschreiben Ströme fehlerhaft und diffus und beschreiben unabhängige Flüsse, um das System darzustellen. Die Experte sehen einen eindeutigen Zusammenhang zwischen der Verschmutzung und den damit verbundenen gesundheitlichen Risiken. Die Einheimischen beschrieben Grundwasser als sauberes Trinkwasser, das vom Regen gespeist wird, aber im Ozean eingelagert ist. Sie beschreiben Flüsse in unzulänglicher Weise und haben keine Kenntnisse von dem Konzept, dass das Grundwasser in einem porösen Medium gespeichert wird. Die lokale Bevölkerung sieht keinen Zusammenhang zwischen der Verschmutzung (z. B. Einsatz von Pestiziden) und gesundheitlichen Risiken. Insgesamt betrachtet überschneiden sich die mentalen Modelle nicht, da die Einheimischen kein klares Verständnis von ihrem Einfluss auf das System haben, während dies bei den Experten der Fall ist. Die Interviews haben ebenso einen tiefes Gefühl des Verlusts des lokalen und traditionellen Wissens deutlich gemacht, sowie ein starkes Verlangen mehr über das Grundwasser zu erfahren, die kulturellen Praktiken wiederzugewinnen sowie die lokalen Werte wiederzubeleben. Es scheint, dass der gegenwärtige Regulierungsweise der Cenotes alle vier Formen dieses Regime umfasst, aber meistens in vermischter oder unklarer Weise. Die Befragten der Gemeinden scheinen die Verschmutzung der Cenotes und die Regulierungsweisen nicht miteinander zu verbinden und wissen nicht, was dies für die Führungsaufgaben impliziert Die Antworten deuten darauf hin, dass die Befragten nicht verstehen, dass alle Cenotes Teil eines einzigen zusammenhängenden Grundwassersystems sind und die kulturellen Werte scheinen nicht berücksichtigt zu werden. Die untersuchten Cenotes machen Praktiken der Schmutzwassereinspeisung mit offen-illegalen Entsorgungsweisen erkennbar. Die am stärksten kontaminierten Standorte sind diejenigen mit offenem Zugang. Wir sammelten ca. 400 kg Kunststoffe und feste Abfälle aus nur einem der erkundeten Cenotes. Plastiktüten, Becher, Dosen, Zigarettenkippen waren die am meisten gesammelten Gegenstände. Durch die Erkundung von unterirdischen Gewässern in Höhlensystemen wurden aktuelle Hotspots der Umweltverschmutzung aufgrund der schlechten Praktikern der Müllentsorgung vor Ort belegt. Die Interviews enthüllten das tiefe Empfinden eines Verlusts von lokalem und traditionellem Wissen sowie einen starken Wunsch, mehr über das Grundwasser zu lernen, die verlorengegangene kulturellen Praktiken wiederzugewinnen und lokale Werte neu zu beleben. Durch Säuberungsaktionen in den Dolinen entwickelte die Einheimischen ein Bewusstsein für die Gefährdung des Grundwassers durch die menschlichen Aktivitäten (insbesondere Landwirtschaft) und diese lieferte Einsichten über die Ursachen der lokalen Verschmutzung. Die direkte Beteiligung von politischen Entscheidungsträgern, Experten und Einheimische war ein entscheidender Schlüssel, um die Projektphasen in einem iterativen Prozess zu validieren und zugleich die Differenzen zwischen Wissenschaft, Politik und Gesellschaft zu verringern und Wege für eine nachhaltigere Nutzung des Grundwassers zu erschließen. Schlussfolgerungen und Hauptaussagen Technische Lösungen für Grundwasserprobleme sind von Bedeutung; jedoch ist ebenfalls die Einbindung von lokalen Stakeholder von entscheidender Wichtigkeit. Wir betonen zwar ebenfalls die Relevanz von Modellen, bieten aber einen umfassenderen Ansatz zur Betrachtung der lokalen Grundwasserprobleme an, indem wir die Beteiligten während des Forschungsprozesses einbeziehen. Dies ist eine zuverlässige und vielseitige Methodologie mit wesentlicher Bedeutung für den Erhalt der Nachhaltigkeit des Grundwassers. Dies kann auf die spezifischen sozialen, wirtschaftlichen, politischen und ökologischen Bedingungen verschiedener Regionen angewendet werden. Eine echte Transformation ist hinsichtlich der Art und Weise erforderlich, in der wir Grundwassersysteme bewerten, managen und charakterisieren, da die Anwendung von einfachen hydrologischen Modelle und isolierten Ansätze von Einzeldisziplinen fehlgeschlagen sind. Notwendig ist die Entwicklung umfassender, soziale und ökologische Dimensionen integrierender Modelle.
Groundwater, cenotes, Yucatan, Maya, Mexico, Socio-Ecological Systems
López Maldonado, Yolanda Cristina
2018
English
Universitätsbibliothek der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
López Maldonado, Yolanda Cristina (2018): Understanding socio-groundwater systems: framework, toolbox, and stakeholders’ efforts for analysis and monitoring groundwater resources. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty of Geosciences
[img]
Preview
PDF
Lopez_Maldonado_Yolanda.pdf

9MB

Abstract

Groundwater, the predominant accessible reservoir of freshwater storage on Earth, plays an important role as a human-natural life sustaining resource. In recent decades there has been an increasing concern that human activities are placing too much pressure on the resource, affecting the health of the ecosystem. However, because groundwater it is out of sight, its monitoring on both global and local scales is challenging. In the field of groundwater monitoring, modelling tools have been developed for improving insights into groundwater characteristics, dynamics, and patterns in the hydrological cycle. Although models are accessible, the drawbacks are: they are not always locally affordable, data are not always reliable, and stakeholders are not included. Global assessments are important, but problems might be exacerbated if we do not examine groundwater from another perspective by considering that its related problems are largely local. An example of this is the groundwater system in Yucatan, Mexico, a place where groundwater is the only source of freshwater for the population and where inhabitants have to deal with pollution problems, salt intrusion, biodiversity loss and resource degradation. Consequently the water situation can quickly reach critical conditions and even small disturbances may have dramatic consequences. Goal The goal of this research project is to “develop a research toolbox for understanding and developing a monitoring system for socio-groundwater systems. The toolbox includes a transdisciplinary methodology to develop a Socio-Groundwater model, to investigate factors that influence the way in which groundwater resources are managed, to support monitoring efforts and approaches to contribute to groundwater literacy”. The work described in this thesis deals with the design of the framework, characterization and modelling of the system by (i) developing a model by analyzing the relevant fluxes of the groundwater system, (ii) eliciting the stakeholders mental models, their values regarding groundwater use and management, and (iii) proposing a groundwater toolbox to integrate different methods with environmental activities for a better groundwater resource management. Methods This thesis is part of a larger project organized in three phases: development of the framework, the toolbox and monitoring. Five different, interrelated, methodologies for system analysis have been developed and employed, including: 1 material flow analysis (to quantify groundwater flows associated with present-day economic sectors), 2 mental models (to analyze stakeholders’ risk perception regarding groundwater pollution, by eliciting mental models), 3 underwater exploration (to obtain insights about current status of local wells and sinkholes), 4 community-based conservation (to integrate local values, beliefs and perceptions into groundwater conservation), 5 environmental activism (to directly involve stakeholders in local well clean-ups, and community events). These methods were developed in a transdisciplinary process with stakeholders spanning sectors including: NGOs, local communities and policy makers. Analysis and results We analyzed, in a unique way, groundwater in Yucatan, Mexico, where no other sources of freshwater exist. Applying system analysis and bringing local and scientific knowledge, we adapted our framework and methods to understand sociogroundwater systems. Data was obtained from a range of different sources: literature, national and local statistics, stakeholder’s workshops, expert opinions, expert consultation, local interviews, and estimations. Investigation of flows by applying MFA helped us to develop the first Local Groundwater Balance Model. The results from this revealed: a) high wastewater emissions into the aquifer (ca. 6.4 hm3 year−1). Wastewater ranges from grey water to wastewater with high concentrations of organic matter (i.e., discharges from pig farms) and alkaline discharges (i.e., tortilla industry); b) all wastewater emissions are discharged directly into the aquifer without treatment; c) poor recycling practices (<1%, relative to the total water emissions). Mental models of local members and experts were elucidated and discrepancies were found regarding risk perceptions. The results revealed that experts’ conceptions were rather unclear and incomplete, based on characteristics of the system. They described fluxes erroneously, vaguely, and depicted unclear flows representing the system.Experts perceive a clear connection with pollution and related health risks. Locals described groundwater as clean drinking water, originating from rainfall, but stored in the ocean. They described fluxes erroneously and they were not aware of the concept of groundwater stored in a porous medium. The local population did not see any connection between pollution (i.e., use of pesticides) and health related risks. Overall, the mental models did not overlap since locals did not have a clear understanding of their influence on the system whereas experts did. Interviews revealed a profound sense of loss of local and traditional knowledge, a strong desire to learn about groundwater, to restore cultural practices and to revitalize local values. Contemporary governance status and regimes of the cenotes are mostly mixed or unclear. Community respondents did not seem to associate contamination of cenotes and the governance regime, and what that might imply for stewardship responsibilities. Interviewees did not understand that all cenotes are part of a single interconnected groundwater system, and cultural values did not seem to be considered. Speleological records obtained during underwater explorations evidenced current hotspots of pollution due to bad waste disposal local practices. Cenotes explored indicated bad waste disposal practices in open-illegal dumping. Through sinkhole clean-ups, locals were aware of groundwater sensitivity, hazardous materials associated with human activities (i.e., agriculture) and this provided insights into local pollution sources. We collected ca. 400 kg of plastics and solid waste from just one of the cenotes explored. Plastic bags, cups, cans and cigarette butts were amongst the top ten items collected. Direct involvement with policy makers, experts and locals was found to be key to guide and validate the project stages in an iterative process, and simultaneously narrowed the gap between science, policy-making and society towards groundwater sustainability. Conclusions In the study of the groundwater system in Yucatan, we found that technical solutions to groundwater problems are of importance; however, local stakeholder involvement is crucial. We agree with the relevance of models, but we offer a much more comprehensive view and approach to local groundwater problems since we involved stakeholders during the research process. This is a reliable and versatile methodology that meaningfully contributes to groundwater sustainability and literacy. It can be adapted to the specific social, economic, political, and environmental setting of different regions. A real transformation is required in how we value, manage and characterize groundwater systems since hydrological-only models and singlediscipline approaches seemed to have failed. The proposed toolbox, framework and approaches help to identify the patterns of changes in biosphere leading to changes in inequality, as a driver of resource use patterns. To implement SDG 6, our toolbox specifically supports the following Targets 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, and 6.6 (a & b) by: facilitating examination of hotspots of pollution, distribution of flows of hazardous substances, minimizing release of chemicals, ensuring sustainable withdrawals, revealing water extraction trends and sectors with major consumption, strengthening participation of local communities, and safeguarding the ecosystem by recognizing traditional ecological knowledge as an informal norm of monitoring. Our results support the current global monitoring framework of SDG 6, by acknowledging the importance of community participation and that groundwater literacy is essential to effectively address SDG 6 and its water related targets.

Abstract

Problem Grundwasser ist das wichtigste zugängliche Speicherreservoir für Süßwasser auf der Erde. Es besitzt eine zentrale Bedeutung als lebenserhaltende Ressource für die Menschen und die belebte Natur. In den letzten Jahrzehnten wächst die Sorge über den Druck, den die menschlichen Aktivitäten auf diese Ressource ausüben, wodurch die Funktionsfähigkeit des Ökosystems gefährdet wird. Da allerdings das Grundwasser unsichtbar ist, verändert sich dessen Erfassung sowohl auf globaler wie auch lokaler Ebene. Im Bereich des Grundwassermonitorings wurden Werkzeuge der Modellierung entwickelt, welche die Einblicke in die Eigenschaften, die Dynamik und in den Wasserkreislauf des Grundwassers erhöhten. Obwohl diese Modelle zugänglich sind, sind auch Nachteile und Schwierigkeiten zu konstatieren: Sie sind nicht immer vor Ort bezahlbar; Daten sind nicht immer zuverlässig; und einige Interessengruppen sind nicht beteiligt. Globale Beurteilungen sind zwar wichtig, aber die Probleme können sich noch verschärft, wenn das Grundwasser nicht auch aus einer Perspektive betrachtet wird, welche den konkreten lokalen Bezug der Probleme berücksichtigt. Um zu einer Überwindung dieser Probleme beizutragen wird in der vorliegenden Arbeit am Beispiel der Grundwassernutzung in Yukatan das komplexe Zusammenwirken von sozialen und natürlichen Systemen in einem Raum mit geophysikalisch wie auch kulturell einzigartigen Bedingungen untersucht. Ziel Das Ziel des Forschungsvorhabens ist es, einen Forschungs-Werkzeugkasten für das Verständnis und die Entwicklung eines Monitoringsystems für Sozio-Grundwasser- Systeme zu erarbeiten. Die Toolbox beinhaltet eine transdisziplinäre Methodik zur Entwicklung eines Sozio-Grundwasser-Modells, eine Untersuchung der Faktoren, welche die Art und Weise beeinflussen, in der Grundwasserressourcen verwaltet werden, die Unterstützung von Bestrebungen des Monitorings sowie Ansätze, welche zu Grundwasserkenntnissen beitragen. Die vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit der Entwicklung eines Rahmens zur Charakterisierung und der Modellierung des Systems, indem (i) ein Modell entwickelt wird, das die relevanten Flüsse des Grundwassersystems analysiert, (ii) die mentalen Deutungsmuster und die Werte der Interessensgruppen bezüglich der Grundwassernutzung- und Regulierung herausarbeitet und (iii) ein ‘Werkzeugkasten’ vorgeschlagen wird, der verschiedene Methoden der Umweltnutzung integriert und so zu einem besseres Management der Grundwasserressourcen beiträgt. Methodischer Ansatz Wir verwenden fünf verschiedene, miteinander verbundene Methodologien: 1) Materialflussanalyse: um Grundwasserströme im Zusammenhang mit den gegenwärtigen Wirtschaftssektoren zu analysieren; 2) Den Ansatz der strukturellen mentalen Muster, um die unterschiedliche Risikowahrnehmung der Interessensgruppen bezüglich der Verschmutzung des Grundwassers infolge der mentalen Modelle herauszuarbeiten; 3) Unterwassererkundung, um Einblicke bezüglich des aktuellen und tatsächlichen Status der örtlichen Brunnen und Dolinen zu erhalten; 4) Gemeinschaftsorientierte Ansätze, um lokale Werte, Überzeugungen und Wahrnehmungen in Maßnahmen zum Grundwasserschutz zu integrieren; 5) Umweltaktivismus, um beteiligen Akteure direkt in die lokalen Sanierungsmaßnahmen und Community-Events einzubinden. Diese Methoden werden in einem transdisziplinären Prozess mit den Beteiligten (NGOs, kommunale Gemeinden und politische Entscheidungsträger) entwickelt. Analyse und Ergebnisse Untersucht wird das Grundwasser auf der Halbinsel Yukatan in Mexiko, einem einzigartigen Gebiet, wo keine anderen Süßwasserressourcen vorhanden sind. Methoden der Systemanalyse und lokale und wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnisse über dieses Gebiet werden in einer integrierten Perspektive zusammengeführt. Die Daten stammen aus verschiedenen Quellen: Literatur, nationale und lokalen Statistiken, Stakeholder-Workshops, Gutachten, Expertenberatung, lokale Interviews und Schätzungen. Untersuchung über Strömungen durch die Anwendung einer Grundwasserflussanalyse ermöglichten es, ein erstes Modell der Wasser-Balance zu entwickeln und die Schmutzwasseremissionen in die Grundwasserspeicher zu erheben. Die Ergebnisse zeigen: a) hohe Abwasseremissionen im Grundwasser (ca. 6.4 hm3/Jahr). Die Abwässer reichen von Brauchwasser bis hin zu Abwässern mit hohen Konzentrationen an organischen Stoffen (z.B. Einleitungen aus der Schweinehaltung) und alkalische Einträge (d.h. Tortilla-Industrie); b) alle Abwasseremissionen fließen direkt ohne Behandlung in das Grundwasser; c) geringe Recyclingmengen (<1 %, bezogen auf die gesamten Wasseremissionen). Die mentalen Modelle der lokalen Akteure und Experten wurden erfasst und Diskrepanzen in Bezug auf die Risikowahrnehmung gefunden. Die Ergebnisse machen deutlich: Die Vorstellungen der Experten waren ziemlich unklar und unvollständig bezüglich der Eigenschaften des Systems? Sie beschreiben Ströme fehlerhaft und diffus und beschreiben unabhängige Flüsse, um das System darzustellen. Die Experte sehen einen eindeutigen Zusammenhang zwischen der Verschmutzung und den damit verbundenen gesundheitlichen Risiken. Die Einheimischen beschrieben Grundwasser als sauberes Trinkwasser, das vom Regen gespeist wird, aber im Ozean eingelagert ist. Sie beschreiben Flüsse in unzulänglicher Weise und haben keine Kenntnisse von dem Konzept, dass das Grundwasser in einem porösen Medium gespeichert wird. Die lokale Bevölkerung sieht keinen Zusammenhang zwischen der Verschmutzung (z. B. Einsatz von Pestiziden) und gesundheitlichen Risiken. Insgesamt betrachtet überschneiden sich die mentalen Modelle nicht, da die Einheimischen kein klares Verständnis von ihrem Einfluss auf das System haben, während dies bei den Experten der Fall ist. Die Interviews haben ebenso einen tiefes Gefühl des Verlusts des lokalen und traditionellen Wissens deutlich gemacht, sowie ein starkes Verlangen mehr über das Grundwasser zu erfahren, die kulturellen Praktiken wiederzugewinnen sowie die lokalen Werte wiederzubeleben. Es scheint, dass der gegenwärtige Regulierungsweise der Cenotes alle vier Formen dieses Regime umfasst, aber meistens in vermischter oder unklarer Weise. Die Befragten der Gemeinden scheinen die Verschmutzung der Cenotes und die Regulierungsweisen nicht miteinander zu verbinden und wissen nicht, was dies für die Führungsaufgaben impliziert Die Antworten deuten darauf hin, dass die Befragten nicht verstehen, dass alle Cenotes Teil eines einzigen zusammenhängenden Grundwassersystems sind und die kulturellen Werte scheinen nicht berücksichtigt zu werden. Die untersuchten Cenotes machen Praktiken der Schmutzwassereinspeisung mit offen-illegalen Entsorgungsweisen erkennbar. Die am stärksten kontaminierten Standorte sind diejenigen mit offenem Zugang. Wir sammelten ca. 400 kg Kunststoffe und feste Abfälle aus nur einem der erkundeten Cenotes. Plastiktüten, Becher, Dosen, Zigarettenkippen waren die am meisten gesammelten Gegenstände. Durch die Erkundung von unterirdischen Gewässern in Höhlensystemen wurden aktuelle Hotspots der Umweltverschmutzung aufgrund der schlechten Praktikern der Müllentsorgung vor Ort belegt. Die Interviews enthüllten das tiefe Empfinden eines Verlusts von lokalem und traditionellem Wissen sowie einen starken Wunsch, mehr über das Grundwasser zu lernen, die verlorengegangene kulturellen Praktiken wiederzugewinnen und lokale Werte neu zu beleben. Durch Säuberungsaktionen in den Dolinen entwickelte die Einheimischen ein Bewusstsein für die Gefährdung des Grundwassers durch die menschlichen Aktivitäten (insbesondere Landwirtschaft) und diese lieferte Einsichten über die Ursachen der lokalen Verschmutzung. Die direkte Beteiligung von politischen Entscheidungsträgern, Experten und Einheimische war ein entscheidender Schlüssel, um die Projektphasen in einem iterativen Prozess zu validieren und zugleich die Differenzen zwischen Wissenschaft, Politik und Gesellschaft zu verringern und Wege für eine nachhaltigere Nutzung des Grundwassers zu erschließen. Schlussfolgerungen und Hauptaussagen Technische Lösungen für Grundwasserprobleme sind von Bedeutung; jedoch ist ebenfalls die Einbindung von lokalen Stakeholder von entscheidender Wichtigkeit. Wir betonen zwar ebenfalls die Relevanz von Modellen, bieten aber einen umfassenderen Ansatz zur Betrachtung der lokalen Grundwasserprobleme an, indem wir die Beteiligten während des Forschungsprozesses einbeziehen. Dies ist eine zuverlässige und vielseitige Methodologie mit wesentlicher Bedeutung für den Erhalt der Nachhaltigkeit des Grundwassers. Dies kann auf die spezifischen sozialen, wirtschaftlichen, politischen und ökologischen Bedingungen verschiedener Regionen angewendet werden. Eine echte Transformation ist hinsichtlich der Art und Weise erforderlich, in der wir Grundwassersysteme bewerten, managen und charakterisieren, da die Anwendung von einfachen hydrologischen Modelle und isolierten Ansätze von Einzeldisziplinen fehlgeschlagen sind. Notwendig ist die Entwicklung umfassender, soziale und ökologische Dimensionen integrierender Modelle.