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Nyarko, Kingsley (2008): Parental Involvement: A Sine Qua Non in Adolescents' Educational Achievement. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences
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Abstract

This study was conducted in Ghana to investigate, (1) factors that predict parental involvement, (2) the relationship between parental home and school involvement and the educational achievement of adolescents, (3) the relationship between parental authoritativeness and the educational achievement of adolescent students, (4) parental involvement serving as a mediator between their authoritativeness and the educational achievement of the students, and (5) whether parental involvement decreases as children reach adolescence. 239 students from diverse socio-economic backgrounds between the ages of 15 and 20 as well as their teachers took part in the study. As expected, the results indicated a positive and significant correlation between mothers and fathers’ home involvement and the academic achievement of the students. Mothers’ school involvement, but not the fathers’ was also positively and significantly correlated with the educational achievement of the students. However, with respect to stepparents, grandparents, and other guardians, their home and school involvement activities were found to be non-significant to the academic achievement of the students. Mothers’ occupational status emerged as the best predictor of mothers’ home involvement followed by nature of school, mothers’ marital status, and program of study; whereas nature of school was the best predictor of mothers’ school involvement, followed by mothers’ occupational status, and program of study. Nature of school was the only factor that predicted fathers’ home involvement. Furthermore, mothers and fathers’ authoritativeness were positively correlated with the students’ educational achievement whereas the authoritativeness of stepparents, grandparents, and other guardians were not significantly correlated with the school achievement of the students. Finally, parental involvement played a mediation role between their authoritativeness and the educational achievement of the students. The findings highlight the importance of parental involvement in adolescents’ school success.