Logo
DeutschClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings
Zohravi, Maryam (2007): The Effect of Rare Earth Elements on Growth Performance, Tibia Mineralization and Blood Serum of Japanese Quails.. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty of Veterinary Medicine
[img]
Preview
PDF
Zohravi_Maryam.pdf

841Kb

Abstract

The present study was designed to determine the effect of different types and concentrations rare earth elements on growth performance of Japanese quails. 120 and 225 one day old Japanese quails in the first and third experiment respectively were allotted to five dietary treatments: a control group and four REE groups which were supplemented with 50,100, 400 and 800 mg/kg of REE-citrate, a Lanthanoid mixture. In the second experiment 300 one day old Japanese quails were allotted to eight dietary treatments: a control group and seven REE groups which were supplemented with 50 or 100 mg/kg of REE-citrate (type A), lanthanum acetate (type B), lanthanum chloride (type C) and lanthanum carbonate (type D). Each experiment lasted four weeks and during it feed and water was ad libitum. The REE supplements increased the weight gain of Japanese quails compare to control group by 18.5-22% during the first experiment (p<0.05), by 2-6.4% during the second experiment and by 6% during the third experiment. The feed consumption and the feed conversion improvement were not significantly affected by REE in any of the three experiments. REE-citrate improved the feed conversion ratio by 4.6-15.5% and by 5.8-13.1% during the first and third experiments respectively. In the second experiment, the REE-type C at level of 50 mg/kg and REE-type D at level of 100 mg/kg, improved the feed conversion ratio by 1.7-2.6%. Also increasing the level of different types of REE from 50 to 100 mg/kg improved weight gain and feed conversion ratio in the second experiment. In the first experiment, the low concentrations of REE-citrate (50 and 100 mg/kg) significantly increased phosphor content of tibia ash compare to that of other groups (p<0.05). Also the lowest concentrations of REE-citrate (50 mg/kg) significantly (p<0.05) increased tibia magnesium compare to control group and the high concentrations (400 and 800 mg/kg) of REE. In the second experiment, the calcium content of tibia ash of Japanese quails fed 50 mg/kg of REE type B or C was significantly (p<0.05) higher than that of quails fed 50 mg/kg of REE-type A. also the diet supplemented with 100 mg/kg of REE-type B, significantly (p<0.05) decreased the tibia calcium compare to control group. The phosphor content of tibia ash in Japanese quails fed REE-type A was significantly lower than that in quails fed types B, C and D of REE. In the third experiment, the highest concentration of REE-citrate (800 mg/kg) significantly decreased magnesium content of tibia ash compare to other experimental groups including control group (p<0.01, p<0.001). In the first experiment, the lowest concentration of REE-citrate (50 mg/kg) increased calcium content of blood serum compare to control group and significantly (p<0.05) compare to high concentrations (400 and 800 mg/kg) of REE-citrate. Also the Japanese quails fed 400 mg/kg of REE-citrate had significantly (p<0.05) higher magnesium in their blood serum than the quails of other groups. In the second experiment, the diet supplemented with 100 mg/kg of REE-type C significantly (p<0.05) increased serum calcium compare to diets with 100 mg/kg of other types of REE supplements. Based on the results of present study, the optimum concentration range of REE-citrate for improving both growth and tibia mineralization was 50-100 mg/kg of feed. However the diet with 400 mg/kg of REE-citrate also improved growth performance and tibia minerals in experiment 3. Comparison between different rare earth elements showed that Lanthanum salts especially lanthanum-chloride had better effect on growth and tibia mineralization than REE-citrate which was a mixture. The optimum concentration of lanthanum salts for increasing growth performance was 100 mg/kg of feed and for improving bone mineralization was 100 mg/kg of feed.