Logo
DeutschClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings
Vérard, Christian (2004): Palaeozoic Palaeomagnetism of South-Eastern Australia: Implications for the APW path of Gondwana. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty of Geosciences
[img]
Preview
PDF
Verard_Christian.pdf

45Mb

Abstract

The drift history of Gondwana following the break-up of Rodinia (or perhaps Pannotia) to the amalgamation into Pangaea has great implications in many disciplines in Earth sciences, but remains largely unknown. Among the apparent polar wander (APW) paths published for Gondwana in the last few decades, large discrepancies exist (sometimes up to thousands of kilometres). The mid Palaeozoic segment of the APW path is particularly problematic, and two primary schools of thought arise. Some authors favour a Silurian – Devonian loop in their APW path passing through southern South America (on a reconstruction of Gondwana), whereas others draw a path directly through Africa during this period. The main controversy stems essentially from whether or not palaeomagnetic data from eastern Australia are incorporated in order to compensate for the lack of mid Palaeozoic data. Determining whether the terranes of the Southern Tasmanides are (para-)autochthonous or allochthonous in origin is therefore of crucial importance and a matter of intense debate. The aim of the work presented herein is to palaeomagnetically define the positions of these terranes throughout the Palaeozoic in order to better constrain the complex tectonic history of this region and to help clarifying the APW path of Gondwana. The construction of an APW path is discussed herein. An attempt is made to determine whether only “objective” criteria can be employed to select data used to draw an APW path. However, it is shown that the palaeomagnetic database has not enough entries. Subjective data selection must be introduced leading to two end-members: the X-type and the Y-type, thought to be best illustrated by the X-path proposed by Bachtadse & Briden (1991) and the Y-path proposed by Schmidt et al. (1990). These two models are, therefore, used in the discussion of the results obtained for this study. The Southern Tasmanides had a complex tectonic history with several orogenic events throughout the Palaeozoic. The sampling coverage carried out for this study comprises fifty localities (289 sites, 1576 cores, 3969 specimens; see table 1, pages 54-55) distributed along an east-west transect across most of the subdivisions of the Southern Tasmanides. The sampled localities are gathered in three main areas: the Broken Hill area, the Mount Bowen area, and the Molong area, which are situated where no published palaeomagnetic studies were previously available providing, therefore, new information. Sampling and laboratory procedures have been carried out using standard techniques. In particular, detailed stepwise thermal demagnetisation, principal component analysis, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and rock magnetic measurements have been systematically employed. The routine measurement of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility allowed drawing the first maps of the magnetic fabrics throughout the region. A strong correlation between the magnetic fabrics and the main tectonic structures corroborates the existence of cross-structures (E-W) in the Southern Tasmanides. The directions of magnetisation obtained yielded much information, despite poor quality. The effects of weathering are deep, intense and widespread. For example, most of the samples from the Mount Arrowsmith Formation (localities ARR & ARO) and the Funeral Creek Limestone (FUN) in the Broken Hill area (western New South Wales) are totally remagnetised, as well as some from the Mitchell Formation (MIT) in the Molong area (eastern New South Wales). Secondary magnetisations are also largely responsible for the bad results obtained in most of the fifty localities studied. Intermediate directions of magnetisation are common and often result in significant data scattering, as illustrated for instance by results from the Kandie Tank Limestone (KAN; Broken Hill area) or the Ambone and Ural Volcanics (HOP, BOW, SHE; Mount Bowen area). In general, it has not been possible to precise the remagnetisation process leading to those scattering. Nevertheless, a major remagnetisation event, probably thermo-chemical in origin, has been also recognised. This event is thought to be Oligocene in age and triggered by changes in geothermal gradient prior to the onset of hot spot volcanism in the Molong area. The existence of Jurassic overprints are also suggested, in particular in the Broken Hill area, possibly in association of intrusion of mafic dykes. All other magnetic components described herein are considered Palaeozoic in age, but further constraints on age are very difficult to establish since field tests are most often not significant. Palaeopoles obtained from three localities, however, are believed to correspond to primary magnetisations. The pole from the Late Cambrian Cupala Creek Formation (CUP), confirmed by a positive unconformity test, implies that this zone can be regarded fixed relative to the craton since the Late Cambrian. In the Early Devonian Mount Daubeny Formation (DAU), the applied fold test, contact test and conglomerate test indicate the primary origin of the magnetisation carried by haematite. The corresponding pole (DAU) is, however, significantly distinct from the VGP deduced from the Early Devonian Ural Volcanics (MER) showing that at least one of the two localities has been rotated. The MER pole agrees with the remagnetisation pole associated with the Cupala Creek Formation, and favours the X-type of APW path proposed by Bachtadse & Briden (1991) for Gondwana. The outcome of this agreement contradicts the Y-type path and the existence of a Silurian – Devonian loop mainly anchored on the Early Devonian Snowy River Volcanics pole obtained by Schmidt et al. (1987). Invocation of terrane rotation, arising possibly from a pull-apart basin, may explain the discrepancy between the pole from Mount Daubeny Formation and the X-path. The most significant finding of this study is the widespread terrane rotation. This conclusion is based upon the inability of intermediate directions of magnetisation, alternate APW path for Gondwana, true polar wander or non-dipole field contribution to correctly explain the distribution of these new data. Consequently, one has to admit that block translation and rotation occurred in the Southern Tasmanides in the first half of the Palaeozoic Era and perhaps up to the Early Carboniferous. A possible scenario concerning the tectonic arrangement of blocks in the Southern Tasmanides is presented in conclusion. This palinspastic model involves block translation in the Siluro-Devonian, and rotation in the Early and more probably Middle Devonian, with late tectonic displacements and rotations in the South-Western Belt of the Lachlan Orogen in the Late Devonian to Early Carboniferous.

Abstract

Die Geschichte der Kontinentaldrift Gondwanas seit dem Aufbrechen Rodinias (oder vielleicht Pannotias) bis zur Angliederung an Pangea hat zwar bedeutende Auswirkungen auf viele Teildisziplinen der Geowissenschaften, ist aber weitestgehend unbekannt. Bei den scheinbaren Polwanderungskurven (SPWK), die in den letzten Jahren publiziert worden sind, gibt es große Abweichungen (mehr als tausend Kilometer). Besonders problematisch ist das Segment der SPWK während des mittleren Paläozoikums. Zwei deutliche Interpretationen diese Segments werden in der wissenschaftliche Literatur kontrovers diskutiert. Einige Autoren favorisieren eine SPWK die während des Silurs und Devons in einem Bogen um das südliche Südamerika verläuft (in einer Rekonstruktion Gondwanas in afrikanischen Koordinaten), wohingegen andere Autoren die Kurve für diesen Zeitraum direkt durch Afrika zeichnen. Der Hauptunterschied zwischen diesen beiden Modellen beruht auf der zugrundeliegenden Auswahl der paläomagnetischen Daten, insbesondere ob Ergebnisse aus Ost-Australien in die Analyse mit einbezogen werden oder nicht. Dies ist von besonderer Bedeutung da gerade für das mittlere Paläozoikum äußerst wenige Daten zur Verfügung stehen. Ausschlaggebend ist darüberhinaus die Frage, ob die terranes der südlichen Tasmaniden (para-)autochthon oder allochthon sind. Das Ziel dieser Arbeit ist die paläomagnetische Bestimmung der Positionen dieser terranes während des Paläozoikums, um die tektonische Entwicklung dieser komplexen Region besser zu verstehen, und somit Klarheit in den Verlauf der SPWK zu bringen. Das Verfahren zur Erstellung einer SPWK wird in Kapitel 2 dieser Arbeit diskutiert. Dazu wird untersucht, ob „objektive“ Kriterien bei der Datenauswahl für den SPWK-Verlauf ausreichend sind. Allerdings zeigt sich, daß für eine derartige Analyse zu wenig Eintragungen in der paläomagnetischen Datenbank vorliegen. Daher muß eine „subjektive“ Selektion durchgeführt werden. Dies führt zu zwei unterschiedlichen Gruppen von Ergebnissen: dem X- und Y-Typ der SPWK Gondwanas. Am besten wird der X-Typ durch die Kurve von Bachtadse und Briden (1991), der Y-Typ durch die Kurve von Schmidt et al. (1990) dargestellt. Diese beiden Möglichkeiten werden für die Diskussion der Ergebnisse dieser Studie verwendet. Die südlichen Tasmaniden haben eine komplexe tektonische Geschichte mit mehreren orogenen Phasen während des Paläozoikums. Die Proben für diesen Teil der Arbeit stammen von fünfzig Lokalitäten (289 Probenlokationen, 1576 Kerne, 3969 Einzelproben; siehe Tabelle 1, S. 54-55), entlang eines Ost-West-Profils durch die südlichen Tasmaniden. Zu den beprobten Einheiten lagen bisher keine veröffentlichten paläomagnetischen Untersuchungen vor. Drei Beprobungsgebiete können unterschieden werden: das Broken Hill Region, das Mount Bowen Region und das Molong Region. Bei Beprobung und Laboruntersuchung wurden paläomagnetische Standardtechniken angewendet. Insbesondere wurden folgende Untersuchungen systematisch durchgeführt: detaillierte thermische Entmagnetisierung und Analyse der Richtungskomponenten sowie Messung der Anisotropie der magnetischen Suszeptibilität und der gesteinsmagnetischen Eigenschaften. Anhand der Anisotropie der magnetischen Suszeptibilität konnte eine Karte des magnetischen Gefüges der Region erstellt werden. Neben der starke Korrelation des magnetischen Gefüges mit den charakteristischen tektonischen Strukturen (N-S) der Region zeigen die Daten auch die Existenz von ost-west gerichteten Störungen. Die oftmals sehr komplexen Magnetisierungsrichtungen liefern wertvolle Informationen. Die beprobten Gesteine sind generell stark und tiefgreifend verwittert. So sind beispielsweise die Proben von der Mount Arrowsmith Formation (Lokalitäten ARR & ARO) und die Kalksteine des Funeral Creeks (FUN) in der Region von Broken Hill (westliches New South Wales) vollständig remagnetisiert. Dies gilt auch für einige Proben von der Mitchell Formation in der Region von Molong (östliches New South Wales). Starke sekundäre Überprägungen der Magnetisierung werden auch bei den Proben der übrigen Lokalitäten beobachtet. Nicht immer war es möglich die verschiedenen Remanenzkomponenten eindeutig zu isolieren. Dies führt zu einer starken Streuung der Richtungen, wie es unter anderem bei den Lokalitäten der Kandie Tank Kalksteine (KAN, Broken Hill) oder der Ambone und Ural Vulkaniten (HOP, BOW, SHE, Mount Bowen) der Fall ist. All diese Remagnetsierungen können nicht einem einzelnen Remagnetisierungs-prozess zugeordnet werden. In einigen Fällen allerdings zeigen die Überprägungen konsistente Richtungen. Diese Remagnetisierung ist wahrscheinlich thermo-chemischen Ursprungs und wurde im Oligozän erworben. Man nimmt an, daß sie durch Veränderung des geothermischen Gradienten vor dem Einsetzen des Hotspot Vulkanismus in der Region von Molong ausgelöst wurde. Die Existenz jurassischer Überprägungen, besonders in der Region von Broken Hill, kann auf die Intrusion mafischer Gänge zurückgeführt werden. Alle anderen in dieser Arbeit beschriebenen Magnetisierungskomponenten werden als Remanenzen paläozoischen Alters interpretiert. Eine genauere zeitliche Einordnung des Remanenzerwerbs dieser Komponenten gestaltet sich schwierig da die paläomagnetischen Tests oft insignifikante Ergebnisse liefern. Die Resultate von drei Lokalitäten werden allerdings als primäre paläozoische Magnetisierungen betrachtet. Der Paläopol der spätkambrischen Cupala Creek Formation (CUP) ist durch einen positiven Diskordanz Test verifiziert. Dieser Paläopol belegt, daß sich diese Region relativ zu dem Kraton seit dem späten Kambrium nicht bewegt hat. Die charakteristische Magnetisierung der frühdevonischen Mount Daubeny Formation (DAU) wird von Hämatit getragen. Sowohl der Faltentest als auch der Kontakt- und Konglomerattest zeigen das diese Magnetisierungs-komponente primär ist. Der sich ergebende Paläopol weicht allerdings signifikant von dem virtuelle geomagnetische Pol (VGP) der frühdevonischen Ural Vulkanite (MER) ab. Es muß daher eine relative Rotation der beiden Einheiten gegeneinander angenommen werden. Der MER Pol ist konsistent mit dem remagnetisierten Pol der Cupala Creek Formation und unterstützt die Hypothese von Bachtadse und Briden (1991) einer SPWK des X-Typs für Gondwana. Der silurische-devonische Bogen in der SPWK nach dem Y-Typ, der hauptsächlich auf den Daten der devonische Vulkanite des Snowy Rivers (Schmidt et al., 1987) basiert, kann daher ausgeschlossen werden. Die Abweichung des Pols der Mount Daubeny Formation vom Pfad des X-Typs kann mit einer Terranrotation, möglicherweise in Folge der Bildung eines „Pull-Apart-Basins“, erklärt werden. Das Hauptergebniss dieser Arbeit ist der Nachweis verbreiteter Rotationen der einzelnen Terrane der südlichen Tasmaniden. Die meisten der beobachteten Paläopole können weder durch die Verwendung der zwei konkurierenden SPWK-Modelle noch durch andere Effekte wie „True-Polar-Wander“ oder Nicht-Dipol Anteile des Erdmagnetfeldes erklärt werden. Nur unter Annahme von Blocktranslationen und –rotationen in der ersten Hälfte des Paläozoikums, oder auch bis in das frühe Karbon, lassen sich die Beobachtungen in Einklang bringen. Ein Szenario für die Verteilung der einzelnen Terrane in den südlichen Tasmaniden wird in Kapitel 8 entwickelt. Dieses paläogeographische Modell beinhaltet Blocktranslationen im Silur/Devon. Rotation treten in diesem Modell im frühen bis mittleren Devon auf. Spätere tektonische Verschiebungen und Rotationen im südwestlichen Gürtel des Lachlan Orogens sind demnach vom späten Devon bis zum frühen Karbon zu beobachten.